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Wednesday, February 15, 2006: Page updated at 12:00 AM

Three Chief Sealth players: How parents say they got there

JIM BATES / THE SEATTLE TIMES

CHRISTINA NZEKWE, NO. 14, JUNIOR
The 6-foot-4 forward enrolled at Chief Sealth in 2003 after head coach Ray Willis and his assistants talked up their program while Christina was in middle school.

What her mother, Barbara Nzekwe, says: "She was playing for middle school, and both Amos [Walters] and Willis came to watch her play. ... Then they would talk to her and ask her questions, and ask her if she would like to come to Chief Sealth. ... They said she was a good player and they liked the way she played. ... He [Willis] told me if Christina [came] he can help her get to college and a scholarship."



MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

REGINA ROGERS, NO. 34, JUNIOR
The 6-foot-3 forward was enrolled at Garfield but changed her mind at the last minute in 2003 and enrolled at Chief Sealth. Her stepfather, Eddie Winston, says he was given a volunteer coaching job at Chief Sealth to get his daughter to enroll.

What her stepfather, Eddie Winston, says: "We had no idea what was going on at the high-school level. I mean, we didn't know this was illegal. I mean, we were junior-high-school parents with kids who we wanted to go to high school and eventually go on and get scholarships. And this man came in and explained to us all the things that he could do, and it all sounded wonderful. It sounded great."



STEVE RINGMAN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

DENAY BOSWELL, 2003-05 TEAMS, NO. 11, GRADUATED LAST YEAR
Boswell, a 5-foot-2 guard, played at Mariner High School near Everett before enrolling at Chief Sealth for her junior year in 2003. Her mother, Darliene, says assistant coach Amos Walters gave her a fake lease agreement to make it appear the family lived in West Seattle. She now plays at Highline Community College.

What her mother, Darliene, says: "Ray said, 'We're trying to build a good program and we're looking for talented players. If she comes to Chief Sealth she'll play, and I can put that in writing.' "

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