Advertising

seattletimes.com NWclassifieds.com NWsource.com
A Service of The Seattle Times Company
seattletimes.com
Home delivery Contact us Search archives
HOME
Site index

« Education

M. Luther King Jr.
· MLK Timeline
· In His Voice
· Photo Gallery
· Civil Rights Timeline
· The Legacy
· Roadways Across America
· The Holiday
· Interactive Classroom
  Student essays
  Classes in conversation
  Interactive quiz
  Study guide
  Internet links
· Guestbook
· Joint Media Campaign




Thursday, January 15, 1998 - 03:40 a.m. Pacific

Students Essays: Amphay Thiraphouth

Amphay Thiraphouth | Michael West | Dana Burns
Jesse Sexton | Aurora Lehr

A new generation believes the Dream

By Amphay Thiraphouth
Rainier Beach School

Amphay Thiraphouth Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is a person who means a lot of things to people. I think he represents everyone's struggle in life.

What he means to me is my own struggle in life. He makes me think that no matter if I am an Asian or not, I can conquer anything and anybody. No matter what color I am, I'm still a person with feelings and personality. Dr. Martin Luther King . . . fought for what he believed was justice. Even now racism still exists, that is why he is known as the leader of blacks' rights. His speech, "I have a dream . . . " is so famous because everyone has a dream no matter what color he is. I didn't understand why someone would kill such a noble man. I guess it is because someone didn't like what he died for - an important cause, which is the truth that each person has in himself.

Everyone is prejudiced in one way or another, either it is rich people that hate the poor ones, people prejudiced against gays and lesbians, and the list goes on and on.

Dr. Martin Luther King is just one of the people that actually brought up racism and justice issues, but most people are not born prejudiced. People are not born with the thinking, "I hate blacks" or "I hate Asians" or any other races. They are led to this thinking by society, people around them and how people live today.

Dr. Martin Luther King's struggles make me think of my own kid. I would not put racism in my kid's mind. I will teach her to not look at colors in people, but to look at the minds of people. If one day she marries someone of another race, it would be fine with me because I believe everyone should be treated equally.

Amphay Thiraphouth | Michael West | Dana Burns
Jesse Sexton | Aurora Lehr





Advertising


seattletimes.com home
Home delivery | Contact us | Search archive | Site index
NWclassifieds | NWsource | Advertising info | The Seattle Times Company

Copyright

Back to topBack to top