Pacific Northwest | August 3, 2003Pacific Northwest MagazineAugust 3, 2003seattletimes.com home
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CONTENTS
COVER STORY
PLANT LIFE
TASTE
ON FITNESS
NORTHWEST LIVING
NOW & THEN
PREVIOUS ISSUES OF PACIFIC NW


GRAPHIC BY MICHELE LEE MCMULLEN

The elements of a stroke

Sculling requires a combination of skills involving balance, power, timing and technique. The basic technique can be explained in these four movements:

Graphic

Catch
Rower is leaning forward, knees bent, arms stretched out; the oar blade enters (catches) the water, propelling the shell forward.

Drive
As the legs start pushing against foot stretchers, the rower slides backward, keeping arms and back straight. Once hands pass knees, arms are quickly pulled in toward the trunk to give the shell its speed.

Feather
Oar handle is lowered to raise blade out of water. Once blade clears water, rower turns handle to position blade parallel to water.

Recovery
With blade out of water, rower begins recovery by stretching hands forward beyond knees. As body follows hands, the seat slides forward and rower is ready to start a new stroke.

Source: "SPORTS: The Complete Visual Reference"

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