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A long year of uncertainty later, we find Northwesterners with transformed values and changed careers, people steeped in personal fear and people standing on the front lines of a murky war, a nation mourning loss and a nation getting on with life. Some people are struggling with the ethics of international conflict; others are pondering what it means to be born on a day that is now synonymous with national tragedy.

Inside

AN ESSAY
After a trying year, one flag still waves in our neighborhood
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PERSONAL VALUES
A chef takes his campaign for understanding on the road
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MUSLIMS
A Seattle ethnic community stung by suspicion
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FEAR
Readersí voices
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PATRIOTISM
A gay man, expelled by the military, still finds ways to serve
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THOSE LEFT BEHIND
Pain still gnaws at those touched directly by 9/11
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VOICES
A collection of comments on our year of change
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COMING OF AGE
What it means to be born on Sept. 11
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THE FRONT LINE
War on terror is as close as our coastlines and borders
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AN ESSAY
Take off my shoes? Iím no terrorist, Iím a dad
Credits

Project editors: Mark Higgins and Sarah Lopez Williams
Designer: Tracy Porter
Desk editor: Dave Rea
Voices

Like many Americans, I have experienced a turbulent, emotional year, trying to piece together the fragments that can explain what happened in New York. What can we do? Live our lives in a way that honors the victims. Accept differences. Respect other cultures. Realize that broad-sweeping policies against ďevilĒ nations may result in greater hatred from their youths, who should not have to glance toward the sky when jets roar overhead. Love what our country stands for and accept its fallibility. Learn to heal with each other. And, above all, tell the stories of those whose voices were silenced the day the Towers fell. They do not deserve to be forgotten.
Meg Matthews, Seattle
Iíve tried not to let the events of Sept. 11 change my life in any way. I believe that the terroristsí primary goal was to dramatically change the ways of the American people. I feel if I alter my chosen path as a result of these attacks, then theyíve succeeded. And Iíll do anything to keep that from happening.
Keri Campbell, Maple Valley

As the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaches, I have a sense of being much more aware for my familyís sake. Itís unlikely Iíll take my children to any large public places around the anniversary, considering the possibility that terrorists may take advantage of the symbolism of the anniversary. I donít walk around afraid, just more aware of the world around us and that the enemy can hit us at home. Itís a time of war, and my family is growing up in it.
Aaron Ott, Everett
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