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Originally published Friday, March 7, 2014 at 9:10 PM

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College hoops

It’s not as easy as “doing what we’re supposed to do”

Any sports fan with more than a few miles on him has heard variations of the following statement countless times: “If we do what we’re supposed to do, we can play with anybody.” It turned up again in Jerry Brewer’s piece that covered aspects of Lorenzo Romar’s coaching career (“What’s past was present,” March 1), among other things. It’s pretty hard to argue with that statement.

The thing about it is, however, that other factors are involved. If the subject is golf, for example, then it would be undeniably and entirely true. It’s just the golfer striving for excellence with nothing to stop him but his own mental and physical limitations. But players engaged in team sports have another unfortunate impediment — other guys play defense. And those people over there are likewise trying to do what they are supposed to do, which is prevent you from functioning the way you want to.

It’s a pity that good intentions are not enough to ensure success. “Doing what we’re supposed to do” is simple and easy to say. But the reality goes significantly deeper.

Tom Likai, Shoreline

Gonzaga team is a joy to watch

I watched Gonzaga wallop a pretty good Saint Mary’s team last week. It was a clinic on playing college basketball. More passing than dribbling (seemed like at least five passes per possession), weave offense, pick and rolls, low-post center, no hurried shots in transition, very few turnovers, solid team defense; it was a joy to watch.

Curt Chambers, Kirkland

High schools

Kudos to Beach coach, players

Thank you, Josh Liebeskind, for your moving story about Rainier Beach boys basketball coach Mike Bethea (“It’s always family time at the Beach,” March 2).

I know people who think too much money and attention is paid to sports, but your story illustrates the positive aspects of a program that values family and community, in addition to winning.

Kudos to Jamal Crawford and others who remaining involved in the program. There are many elements that can inspire a community of students to achieve and a sports program that models teamwork and hard work can contribute to that success. Thank you for sharing the story of this hardworking, dedicated man.

Carol Freise, Seattle

Thanks for coverage of the girls

A huge thank you for finally placing girls high school sports coverage in a prominent position. For years, I cringed when the boys big picture was above the fold, and the girls small photo was below (or worse, buried deep in the back pages).

I like the creative ways you are mixing up the coverage for the best athletes. I especially liked the recent picture where you had a boy and two girls being honored for their abilities.

As a former high-school athlete and the mother of a boy and girl, I am thrilled with the changes you have made.

Meg Satz

Mariners

It’s spring, a time for hope. Right?

It was fall. Eric Wedge had just quit. The Mariners looked pathetic. No one wanted to talk or think about them anymore and in the online version of The Seattle Times, the Mariners’ section of daily links within the Inside Sports section of the main online sports page was replaced by high school sports.

Touché.

Editorial point well made.

But with the signing of Robinson Cano and certainly with the first televised spring training game last week and, yes, despite our annual better judgment, it is time to put it back.

Yes, we might all regret it again by October. But it is part of the American Experience.

Seattle World Series champions 2014!

(Just go with it.)

Karl Simonsen, Redmond

NFL

Goodell shouldn’t change the PAT

Roger Goodell wants to change the NFL’s point after touchdown. This would be a mistake. Every year we see teams on defenses crambling to get the correct players on the field because there may be a two-point conversion attempt. Every year we see teams waste crucial timeouts because they fail to get the right call in under pressure.

The beauty of the PAT is, “Will they go for one or go for two?” We want fourth-quarter drama!

Martin A. Stever, Bainbridge Island

Send us your backtalk:

Letters bearing real names, addresses and telephone numbers for verification are considered for publication. Please limit letters to 125 words or less.

They are subject to editing and become the property of The Times. Fax to 206-493-0934, or mail to: Backtalk, Seattle Times Sports, P.O. Box 70, Seattle, WA 98111. Or email to: sports@seattletimes.com



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