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Originally published July 11, 2013 at 8:09 PM | Page modified July 11, 2013 at 11:47 PM

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Belize players offered bribes before game vs. Team USA

A man who allegedly offered two Belize players large sums of money to fix a CONCACAF Gold Cup match against the United States has been identified by soccer officials.

The Associated Press

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The bribe attempt was apparently wildly successful...or, the suspect is the worst... MORE
seriously, what were they supposed to do, take a bigger dive? :P MORE
This guy has to be the stupidest gambler in the world. 'Could you lose by at least 3... MORE

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SALT LAKE CITY — A man who allegedly offered two Belize players large sums of money to fix a CONCACAF Gold Cup match against the United States has been identified by soccer officials, and he’s believed to have tried to fix matches in other countries.

In a statement Thursday, CONCACAF said it and FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, are investigating the bribery allegations made by Ian Gaynair and Woodrow West. The two players said they rejected the offer, made Sunday, and immediately reported it. When a CONCACAF representative showed them a photo of a man being monitored for trying to fix matches in other countries, the Belize players confirmed it was the same man who had approached them.

“So this isn’t just about our country or a one-time thing,” Belize coach Ian Mork said after practice. “This is something much bigger.”

Belize lost to the United States 6-1 on Tuesday night in the Jaguars’ first Gold Cup appearance. They face Costa Rica on Saturday night, again in Salt Lake City, and finish Group C play next Tuesday against Cuba in East Hartford, Conn.

CONCACAF, which is the federation of North and Central American and Caribbean nations, said it could not comment further on the ongoing investigation. But Mork said he doesn’t believe the players were asked to fix any other games.

Match fixing is a global problem in soccer, with FIFA estimating that fixers make more than $5 billion in profits each year from manipulating matches.

Notes

• Manchester United striker Wayne Rooney returned to England from the club’s preseason tour of Asia because of a hamstring injury.

• The New York Red Bulls signed defender Ibrahim Sekagya, 32, from Uganda.

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