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Originally published Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at 8:30 PM

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Prolific kicker John Kasay retires as a Carolina Panther | NFL

Kicker John Kasay signed a one-day contract so he could retire as a Carolina Panther. Kasay kicked for the Seahawks from 1991 through the 1994 season.

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — John Kasay retired as a Carolina Panther on Tuesday, a fitting end for a kicker who played in more games than anyone in franchise history.

Kasay, 43, signed a one-day contract, then spoke to media at a reception attended by his family, members of the Panthers' front office and several former teammates.

"I've been to these and lots of times they come off more like funerals than they do celebrations. And it really is (a celebration)," Kasay said after opening remarks from Panthers owner Jerry Richardson.

"I told Mr. Richardson the reason I wanted to do this is simply I can't write 70,000 thank-you notes. I wish that I could. But this is my feeble attempt to tell everybody thank you."

Kasay kicked for the Seahawks — who drafted him out of Georgia — from 1991 through the 1994 season. He was with the Panthers from 1995 until being released before the 2011 season and kicked for New Orleans that season. He was out of the league last season.

Kasay ranks sixth in NFL history with 461 field goals and eighth with 1,970 points. He is tied for second all time in field goals of 50 yards or longer with 42.

Kasay holds more than 20 team records, and his 221 games with Carolina are the most in franchise history.

Kasay recently was named athletic director at Charlotte Christian, a private school where two of his children are enrolled.

Browns owner Haslam

apologizes to fans

WESTLAKE, Ohio — Embarrassed by a federal investigation of fraud inside his truck-stop company, Browns owner Jimmy Haslam apologized to Cleveland fans and promised to bring the city a winning team.

Haslam, who purchased the Browns last year from Randy Lerner, was the featured speaker at a scholar-athlete banquet. It was one of Haslam's first public appearances in Ohio since the FBI raided the headquarters of Pilot Flying J, his family's business, last month as part of an investigation into an alleged fraud scheme.

From a dais that included Ohio State coach Urban Meyer and former Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel, Haslam spoke to a packed banquet room and held a brief news conference afterward when he offered his regrets about recent legal troubles.

"I apologize to the city of Cleveland, Northeastern Ohio and all Browns fans because the last thing we ever wanted to do as a new owner was detract from football and the Browns and just what a great football area this is, and so I apologize for that," Haslam said.

Haslam was pressed about his knowledge of the purported fraud at Pilot Flying J, a company founded by his father 54 years ago, but declined to respond.

Singer replacement:

Underwood for Hill

NEW YORK — Carrie Underwood will take over the theme song for "Sunday Night Football," with NBC sticking to the formula of a female country-music star for its intro.

Underwood steps in for Faith Hill, 45, who announced last month she would not be back for a seventh season.

Underwood, 30, will sing a new version of "Waiting All Day for Sunday Night," network officials said.

Note

• California authorities say ex-Detroit Lions receiver Titus Young was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence early Sunday — then arrested again the same day for allegedly trying to take his car from a tow yard.

Riverside County sheriff's spokeswoman Lisa McConnell said Young, 23, was arrested on suspicion of DUI, cited and released.

About 14 hours later, police responded to a report of a man jumping over the fence of a tow company and arrested Young. He was booked on suspicion of burglary.

The Lions released Young in February after a drop in productivity and disputes with teammates.

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