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Originally published December 29, 2012 at 8:03 PM | Page modified December 29, 2012 at 8:03 PM

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2012 newsmakers: Golden Tate

Golden Tate's controversial touchdown catch to beat the Packers on Monday Night Football might be the biggest play in a Seahawks season full of them.

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Golden Tate hopes it isn't the catch that defines his career. But it might have been the moment that mobilized the Seahawks' season.

Tate's astounding 24-yard touchdown catch to beat the Green Bay Packers on the final play of Seattle's third game was polarizing. Seahawks fans loved it, most everyone else was dubious, and Packers fans were furious.

It was galvanizing as many people credit the resulting controversy for ending the NFL officials lockout three days later.

And for Tate, the catch has been enduring. The replay is ubiquitous on highlight shows. It's brought up constantly in interviews and mentioned often in interactions with fans — though Tate is happy to note he has provided more conversational fodder as the season has progressed.

"I feel I've made more plays, so they talk about more recent ones more than anything," he said.

This has been a breakout season for Tate, a second-round draft pick out of Notre Dame in 2010. He has turned into the big-play threat the Seahawks envisioned, catching 40 passes for 556 yards and seven touchdowns, and even throwing a TD pass. In his first two seasons combined, Tate had 56 catches for 609 yards and three TDs.

Still, the Green Bay Hail Mary remains Tate's calling card.

"I did what I was taught to do, which is compete for the ball," he said recently. "If I had to do it all over again, I'd probably do the same things, which is do whatever it takes to come up with the ball."

Larry Stone

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