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Originally published Friday, July 25, 2014 at 6:15 AM

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Sebi’s Bistro: Cozy European cuisine in an urban castle

Sebi’s Bistro on Eastlake offers a taste of the Old World with Polish fare and pizzas.


Seattle Times staff reporter

Sebi’s Bistro

European

3242 Eastlake Ave. E., Seattle; 206-420-2199

Hours: 4-10 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday; closed Sunday

Etc: credit cards accepted; full bar; wheelchair accessible; street parking or in the old Red Robin lot across the street

Prices: $-$$

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It was only a matter of time before the turreted, castle-inspired building at Eastlake and Fuhrman in Seattle’s Portage Bay neighborhood was turned into a restaurant specializing in Central European fare, considering it already resembles a place you’d stumble upon in one of that region’s capital cities.

Along comes Sebi’s Bistro, a Polish-inspired eatery whose menu pays homage to that country while also serving pizza and sandwiches.

Helmed in the kitchen by Polish-born chef Kamila Kanczugowski and managed by her son David Kanczugowski, Sebi’s (named after her other son Sebastian) quickly became a favorite of Seattle’s active Polish-American community when it opened last year. But really, who can resist the Old World appeal of fluffy, stuffed dumplings and cabbage rolls with a pint of good beer on the side? Fortunately, the food lives up to the intriguing architecture.

The menu: Pizzas ($7-$14), hot sandwiches ($7-$8), salads ($5-$15) and other pub-style offerings make up most of the menu, but it’s Kanczugowski’s Polish specialties that set Sebi’s apart. The pierogi ($12-$13), Polish-style dumplings, come filled with potato and cheese or meat, while the cabbage rolls ($11), known as golabki, are stuffed with meat, rice and sautéed onions and topped with tomato sauce. There’s schnitzel ($15), breaded pork loin, and grilled kielbasa ($7), or Polish sausage, too. Order one of the sampler platters ($15-$20) for a taste of several specialties in one meal.

What to write home about: The Polish Platter ($15), with dumplings, a cabbage roll, kielbasa and sauerkraut, offered a fine, very filling, sampling of everything that makes Polish food so heartwarmingly satisfying.

The setting: The spacious dining room, with a bar in back, looks out onto the busy traffic around Portage Bay, but the friendly staff and homey décor make for a cozy ambience.

Summing up: A Polish Platter ($15) and a pint of Czech beer ($6) came to $23 plus tip.

Tyrone Beason: tbeason@seattletimes.com



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