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Originally published May 10, 2013 at 5:33 AM | Page modified May 10, 2013 at 2:52 PM

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Rain Shadow Meats: meaty fare in Pioneer Square

Seattle Times staff writer

Rain Shadow Meats

Deli

404 Occidental Ave. S., Seattle

206-467-4854

www.rainshadowmeats.com

Hours: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on weekends.

Etc: Visa and MasterCard. Street parking

Prices: $$

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Once beleaguered, Pioneer Square has gotten some hipster cred of late, thanks to a wave of restaurants popping up in this old ’hood.

Rain Shadow Meats is one of those cool new kids. The Capitol Hill butcher shop in Melrose Market recently opened a deli/ butcher shop on the corner of South Jackson Street and Occidental Ave South, joining other stellar sandwich stops such as Delicatus, Tat’s Delicatessen and Salumi in the area.

The menu: A few hearty salads ($7-$8) and charcuterie and cheese plates ($10-$12) are featured. But for the lunch crowd, it’s mostly about the sourdough and French bread ($10-$12) stuffed with meat roasted or cured in-house.

What to write home about: The Zuni ($10) — thin slices of roasted-pork shoulder and arugula on a buttery, toasted sourdough. But it’s the heaping of sweet ricotta that makes this sandwich a rich and creamy delight. A pile of corned beef on rye ($12) with some crunchy caraway coleslaw, cut with Gruyere, is one of its hearty lunch offerings.

What to skip: The pork cracklins are the best part of the porchetta sandwich, the French bread of which was somewhat overwhelmed by the sauce verte.

The setting: It’s a butcher shop meets warehouse district, with an open kitchen and three display cases of imported salumi and slabs of meat. There’s an exposed brick wall with distressed markings and shared tables in the front where restaurant-industry folks drink Rainier tall boys.

Summing up: Two sandwiches ($12 each), a plate of speck, pickled herring and chopped egg ($10), a chorizo small plate ($8 during happy hour) and a pilsner totaled $50.37, enough for a big dinner for two. Food is meaty and filling as you would expect from a butcher shop/deli, but diners will more likely note that sandwiches cost a couple bucks more than the competitors.

Tan Vinh: 206-515-5656 or tvinh@seattletimes.com. On Twitter @tanvinhseattle

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