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Originally published Friday, October 12, 2012 at 5:31 AM

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The Neighbor Lady: Enticingly healthful spin on pub grub

The Neighbor Lady is a local brothel-themed pub in the Central area with a menu that offers options for vegans, vegetarians, gluten-free devotees and meat lovers. Stephan Mollmann, owner of the nearby Twilight Exit bar, and Shira Bray, a Twilight bartender and manager, opened The Neighbor Lady last spring in the space where Thompson's Point of View used to be.

Special to The Seattle Times

The Neighbor Lady

American

2308 E. Union St., Seattle; 206-695-2072

Hours: 4 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Monday-Sunday

Etc: Visa and MasterCard; no obstacles to access; street parking and the KeyBank parking lot; full bar

Prices: Prices: $-$$

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For those on the hunt for a local brothel-themed bar, The Neighbor Lady has a booth for you. Tasseled lamps — including one shaped like a woman's leg — illuminate the Central District pub's dark interior and wraparound bar, while a collection of vintage arcade games gleams from its own enticing nook.

Stephan Mollmann, owner of the nearby Twilight Exit bar, and Shira Bray, a Twilight bartender and manager, opened The Neighbor Lady last spring in the space where Thompson's Point of View used to be. The more health-centric of the two pubs, The Neighbor Lady offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. Omnivores needn't fear, however, that they'd be without meat for an evening. The menu has plenty of beefier items, including sliders, corned-beef sandwiches and meatballs.

A quick tip: You'll have to order at the bar as there's no table-waiting service.

The menu: Nearly every item has an asterisk (or rather, a high-heeled shoe icon) denoting vegetarian, vegan or gluten-free options. Shoestring fries or sweet-potato fries come alone ($5) or as a side to a Reuben ($10 with corned beef, $10.50 with Smoked Tomato Field Roast) or a BLT ($8.50 with bacon, $9 with tempeh bacon). Greener items on the menu include a spinach salad with a maple-cayenne mustard dressing ($8), a Caesar salad (small $5.25, large $8) and the rocket salad, made of spicy arugula, goat cheese and pine nuts in a roasted red pepper dressing ($8).

What to write home about: The trio of house-ground beef sliders slathered with truffle aioli and served on petite potato rolls ($9) disappeared from the table in a hurry. For a vegetarian option, the Reuben with Smoked Tomato Field Roast, sauerkraut and rémoulade ($10.50) was delightfully flavorful.

What to skip: The house-made lentil walnut loaf ($11) was a bit flat in taste, but did a remarkable job replicating the texture of meatloaf for nostalgic vegetarians.

The setting: Mismatched lights, patterned wallpaper and the dim glow of the pinball corner.

Summing up: The rocket salad ($8), beef sliders with sweet-potato fries ($9), veggie meatloaf ($11) and the special of the day, a house-smoked pork sandwich called "The Havana" ($10), came to $38 before tax and tip, and were plenty for two with leftovers.

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