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Originally published Friday, April 26, 2013 at 11:30 AM

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Poor response to tip blamed on Cold War distrust

A former official of the Russian government is telling Congress that lingering, Cold War-era distrust may have made American officials less inclined to act on tips from Russian security services about one of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers

Associated Press

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WASHINGTON —

A former official of the Russian government is telling Congress that lingering, Cold War-era distrust may have made American officials less inclined to act on tips from Russian security services about one of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers

Andranik Migranyan is a former member of the President Council of the Russian Federation and now director of the New York-based Institute for Democracy and Cooperation. The institute is a private group that promotes U.S.-Russia cooperation.

Migranyan told a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Friday that Russia and the United States have long viewed each other warily. Because of that, he said, American officials, in his words, "just didn't pay enough attention" when Russian agencies asked the FBI and CIA to look into bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

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