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Originally published March 4, 2013 at 3:42 AM | Page modified March 4, 2013 at 4:05 PM

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Obama to name 3 to Cabinet-level posts Monday

President Barack Obama is announcing his picks for three Cabinet-level jobs - nominees to run the Energy Department, Environmental Protection Agency and budget office.

AP White House Correspondent

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WASHINGTON —

President Barack Obama is announcing his picks for three Cabinet-level jobs - nominees to run the Energy Department, Environmental Protection Agency and budget office.

Obama says energy secretary nominee Ernest Moniz is a "brilliant scientist" who knows how the U.S. can produce more energy and grow the economy. Moniz will work with EPA nominee Gina McCarthy, whom Obama calls a "straight-shooter."

The president also lauded Sylvia Mathews Burwell, his nominee for budget chief, as someone who not only knows how "to make the numbers add up" but also understands the need for strengthening the middle class.

The president announced the nominations at a White House ceremony Monday.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

President Barack Obama will nominate a trio of top advisers Monday, announcing his picks to run the Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency, as well as a new budget chief.

The nominations signal the White House's desire to get back to normal business after the president and Congress failed to avert the $85 billion in automatic spending cuts that started taking effect Friday. While the president has warned of dire consequences for the economy as a result of the cuts, the White House does not want the standoff with Congress to keep Obama from focusing on other second term priorities, including filling out his Cabinet, as well as pursuing stricter gun laws and an overhaul of the nation's immigration system.

Obama's nominee to run the Office of Management and Budget, Sylvia Mathews Burwell, will be a key player in Washington's fiscal fights if confirmed by the Senate.

Burwell is Washington veteran, having served in several posts during the Clinton administration, including deputy OMB director. She currently heads the Wal-Mart Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the retail giant, and previously served as president of the Gates Foundation's Global Development Program.

The president will also nominate MIT scientist Ernest Moniz to head the Energy Department and EPA veteran Gina McCarthy to run the environmental agency.

Moniz, 69, oversees MIT's Energy Initiative, a research group that focuses on innovative ways to produce power while curbing greenhouse gas emissions. But unlike outgoing Energy Secretary Steven Chu, he is also well-versed in the ways of Washington, having served as the Energy Department's undersecretary in the Clinton administration.

Moniz has also advised Obama on central components of the administration's energy plan, including a retooling of the country's stalled nuclear waste program, energy research and development, and unconventional gas.

In a 2009 alumni interview published on Boston College's website, Moniz noted that he learned to balance both political and scientific demands while working in the Clinton administration. "Physics sometimes looked easy compared to doing the people's business," he said.

In nominating McCarthy to be the nation's top environmental steward, Obama is promoting a climate change champion and a 25-year veteran of environmental policy and politics. McCarthy has served under both Republicans and Democrats, and is known for a matter-of-fact approach appreciated by both businesses and environmental advocacy groups.

Among her past bosses: former Massachusetts governor and Obama's Republican presidential opponent Mitt Romney, for whom she was a special adviser on climate and environmental issues.

Since coming to Washington in 2009, McCarthy has been the most prominent defender of EPA policies. As the head of the air pollution division, she has been behind many of the agency's most controversial new rules - from placing the first limits on greenhouse gases on newly built power plants to the first-ever standard for toxic mercury pollution from burning coal for electricity.

Moniz and McCarthy also must be confirmed by the Senate.

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Associated Press writers Dina Cappiello and Matthew Daly contributed to this report.

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