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Originally published Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 12:56 PM

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A closer look at Sandy recovery aid package

The House on Tuesday passed a $50.5 billion package of recovery and related aid for Superstorm Sandy and other disasters. It was divided into two parts: a $17 billion base bill for immediate recovery needs from the late October storm, and a $33.5 billion amendment for longer-term recovery efforts and projects to curb damages from future disasters.

The Associated Press

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The House on Tuesday passed a $50.5 billion package of recovery and related aid for Superstorm Sandy and other disasters. It was divided into two parts: a $17 billion base bill for immediate recovery needs from the late October storm, and a $33.5 billion amendment for longer-term recovery efforts and projects to curb damages from future disasters.

A look at its main provisions:

BASE BILL

-$5.4 billion for New York and New Jersey transit systems.

-$5.4 billion for the Federal Emergency Management Agency's disaster relief aid fund.

-$1.35 billion for Army Corps of Engineers projects.

- $3.9 billion for the Housing and Urban Development Department's community development fund for Sandy recovery projects.

-$235 million for repairs and renovations at Veterans Affairs Department facilities.

-$143 million to the Coast Guard for damages by Sandy.

LONGER-TERM AID AMENDMENT

-$10.9 billion for New York and New Jersey transit system recovery projects.

-$12.1 billion for Housing and Urban Development Department community block grants for Sandy and other federally declared disasters in 2011-13.

-$3.4 billion for Army Corps of Engineers projects for Sandy-related damage and protections against future storms.

- $2 billion for the Federal Highway Administration's emergency relief program to repair storm-damaged federal highways.

-$290 million for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, much of it for programs and equipment to improve weather forecasting.

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