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June 5, 2014 at 1:44 PM

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Medical-marijuana patients don't always know what they're getting


ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Jessica Tonani, CEO of Verda Bio, a small Seattle biotech company, is researching the consistency and variety in medical-marijuana strains.

ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Randy Oliver, chief science officers at A360 in Seattle, one of the pre-eminent testing labs in the pot business, pulverizes a flower with a mortar and pestle so there will be more surface area for the solvent to dissolve the cannabinoids in the material.

ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A marijuana flower on a computer screen, blown up 230x, at A360. A360 does visual assessments on marijuana products -- making sure there are no adulterants, animals, remains, mold, bugs, and feces.

ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Dr. Lara Taubner (l) and Randy Oliver, both chief science officers at A36, check to see how many cannabinoids there are in a sample they just ran in their Seattle office.

ELLEN M. BANNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Tubes at A360 containing samples of products containing marijuana waiting to be tested, sit on a counter at the Seattle lab.

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