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May 30, 2014 at 7:00 PM

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Car trouble - from bikes and buses to ride services and cabs, we're finding reasons to trade them in.


JOHN LOK/ THE SEATTLE TIMES

Annie Kirk checks in the car2go. Cars are monitored for damage and cleanliness, and drivers are rewarded with free minutes for filling up an empty gas tank.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

During rush hour in West Seattle, bike riders have a lot to contend with, including wet, slippery pavement and traffic. But, on the upside, costs are minimal, and bike-commuters may well be the fittest among us.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Devin Burnett waits to cross a busy street in West Seattle on his bike commute home from work recently. Burnett bike-commutes four days a week and takes the bus the rest of the time, but uses the family's one car for transporting his two young kids.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Annie Kirk swipes her car2go membership card to check out a vehicle in Seattle's Chinatown-International District on her way home from work recently. Kirk and her husband signed up for car2go when the service launched in Seattle, to see if it could replace one of their two cars. They're still using car2go for trips downtown, but haven't traded in their second car due to limited car2gos in their neighborhood.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Living in the city means we have a lot of choices for getting around -- from the usual car, bike, bus and taxi to the newer ride-service and car-for-hire options such as car2go and uberX. Each choice has its pluses and minuses.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Ashley Bazurto takes light rail to visit a friend in Seattle. When he worked in Kent, Bazurto commuted daily by light rail and the Sounder train. In 2007, he bought a new car, only to see his savings wiped away by car, gas and insurance payments. After the car was deemed faulty a year later and he got a full refund, he opted not to replace it. "Not having a car and not being in debt feels a lot better day to day than having a car and feeling like you're going backward (financially)."

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A taxi driver, center, helps a man with luggage outside the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle. Traditional taxi drivers here and elsewhere around the country are facing stiff competition from app-based services like uberX and Lyft, which haven't had to operate by all the same rules as heavily regulated cabs.

Read the full story, here.

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