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September 24, 2013 at 8:57 PM

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Japanese soldiers learn tricks of the sniper in Yakima


MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

With the help of Sgt. Chad Quilla, center right, Japanese soldiers practice to set up a shot, after crawling into position, laying local vegetation on their ghillie suits and weapon at Yakima Training Center Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. Under the hot sun and open desert, JBLM Soldiers from the 5th Battalion, 20th infantry regiment train together with Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers as they exchange sniper methodology and experience as part of the joint-exercise between the United States and Japan in Operation Rising Thunder.

MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Spc. Jason Fairchild demonstrates how to conceal a M-24 sniper rifle with local vegetation as part of avoiding detection as a sniper at the Yakima Training Center.

MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

After getting a demonstration from American soldiers, Japanese soldiers practice how to crawl into position, in a painstakingly slow way as to avoid detection, then setup a shot, all while getting critiqued by peers.

MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Spc. Josey Biasatti, sniper, center, and his spotter, Spc. Peter Churchill, right, demonstrate how to cover the standard M-24 sniper rifle with local vegetation before setting up to shoot while wearing a sniper's ghillie suit.

MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

After getting a demonstration from American soldiers, Japanese soldiers try to crawl in a painstakingly slow way as to avoid detection as a sniper.

MARCUS YAM / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Spc. Josey Biasatti, sniper, demonstrates how to crawl into position while wearing a sniper's ghillie suit laced with local vegetation before setting up a shot.

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