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June 26, 2013 at 9:09 PM

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Rain ruins some Washington cherries


ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Workers, including Alina Castillo, in blue, sort through Bing cherries this week at Allan Bros., a growing-packing corporation, in Naches, Yakima County. Washington's cherry harvest began in early June and has been hindered by rain, said Miles Kohl, CEO of Allan Bros.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Bing cherries are carried on a conveyor belt to a sorting area at Allan Bros. To ensure a quality product for the customer, employees sort out cherries that are bruised, rain-split or have bird or insect damage.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Workers sort through Bing cherries this week at Allan Bros., a growing-packing corporation, in Naches, Yakima County.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Washington's cherry harvest began in early June and has been hindered by rain, said Miles Kohl, CEO of Allan Bros. "Rain causes splits through the cherry," he said. "If it absorbs too much water the skin will basically crack from stretching too far." Kolh said the company still has a good supply of high-quality cherries for the market.

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Love those cherries, but they sure are a tender crop. Wonder who has the safety... MORE

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