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April 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM

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Beyond the byline: Stocking larger rainbow trout


JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Hue Ho, lead worker at the Puyallup Fish Hatchery, corrals some of the 4,500 rainbow trout he was preparing for transport to Lake Geneva on Friday, April 18, as part of a lake-stocking effort in preparation for Opening Day of fishing season. Starting last year, the State Department of Fish and Wildlife has been stocking the lakes with larger fish.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Rainbow trout is hoisted from one of the 16 holding ponds at the Puyallup Fish Hatchery into a transportation truck for stocking on Thursday, April 18. Each pond holds approximately 13,000 fish. At right is Hue Ho, lead worker, and at left is Jason Smith, manager of the hatchery.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Starting last fishing season, the State Department of Fish and Wildlife stocked local lakes with larger rainbow trout that measured 10-13 inches in length, like these. In previous years, they were eight to nine inches long.

This template is designed to fit the CP spot of the current HP redesign. Created May 2011

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

In preparation for the start of fishing season, Dept. of Fish and Wildlife staff at the Puyallup Fish Hatchery are stocking lakes throughout the region. Starting last year, the department has been stocking with larger fish than in years past.

THE SEATTLE TIMES

Seattle Times staff photographer John Lok, left, uses an empty aquarium to shoot underwater images of rainbow trout at the Puyallup Fish Hatchery on Thursday, April 18. At right is hatchery staff Hue Ho.

JOHN LOK / THE SEATTLE TIMES

This is the setup that Seattle Times staff photographer John Lok used to photograph underwater images of rainbow trout at the Puyallup Fish Hatchery on Thursday, April 18 2013. He placed a Canon 1DX inside of an aquarium to make images under the water's surface. The radio transmitters were used to fire teh camera as well as strobes located nearby.

For more photos, visit the gallery.

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