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April 7, 2013 at 6:56 PM

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Indigenous arts at Evergreen State College carving shed


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The first class of students at the newly opened carving shed at Evergreen State College learned to make bentwood box drums from master carver David Boxley this past weekend. Clifton Guthrie, at left, puts a bend in his box drum after steaming the cedar board to soften the wood.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Seventeen-year-old Brandon Mayer uses a knife to remove material from his cedar plank.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The new carving shed was made possible through a grant from the Ford Foundation.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Master Carver David Boxley watches over a steaming cedar plank.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Boxley, at left, and Clifton Guthrie, center, help Brandon Mayer, at left, prepare his plank for steaming. Rae Fulmer watches wrapped in a blanket.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

David Boxley adjusts the steamer box as students look on.


MARK HARRISON / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The bent cedar cracks away from the corner.


For more photos from Evergreen State College's class visit the gallery.

Read the story, Evergreen students carve wood, imprint culture in arts program .

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