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March 30, 2013 at 7:01 PM

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Baby lambs and goat kids of Spring


BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mark Williams of Swallow Lane Farm in Olalla, Kitsap County, bottle feeds a 4-day-old lamb birthed by Snowflake, right, Tuesday March 26, 2013. Spring is lambing and goat kidding season at Swallow Lane Farm, which specializes in the breeding and preservation of Jacob Sheep, a rare breed known for their black-and-white coloring and striking horns, bearing two, four or six. They have 17 lambs born and 10 ewes that are still due to give birth. Mark and his wife Cathie moved to Olalla from Kirkland and started raising livestock over 20 years ago to tame the long grass in their yard. They were drawn to raising Jacobs for their hardiness and unique characteristics, and now have the largest breeding flock in the state. In addition to Jacobs, they raise and are birthing naturally colored Angora goats, Nubian and dairy goats, and Tamworth pigs on top of their normal day jobs. Cathie is a kindergarten teacher while Mark is an instructional designer. "It keeps our lives full and our wallets empty," said Mark with a laugh.

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BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mark Williams of Swallow Lane Farm in Olalla, Kitsap County, greets colored Angora goats Paprika, middle, and Coriander, right, as one of their kids wanders in the pen Tuesday March 26, 2013. Williams' daughter Emily, 18, who is now a Bioengineering student at the University of Washington, started the family's colored Angora goats as a project for Future Farmers of America and they have kept it going while she is away in college.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Two Jacob lambs bleat to get their mother's attention, a common behavior that subsides as the ewes start to ignore them. These two were born early in the season, a little February surprise.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mark Williams takes a close look at one of two Jacob lambs born Friday to Aubrey, a 6-year-old ewe. The newest lambs are kept in pens until they can walk with their mothers in the pasture.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Aubrey, a 6-year-old ewe, and her two lambs, who were born Friday, March 23, 2013.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mark Williams checks on a pregnant Nubian goat due to give birth any day. She was so large that she preferred not to stand, and the Williams' believe she may be carrying triplets.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A spectacled Jacob sheep lamb turns an eye out to the pasture while staying by his mother's side.

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