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Seattle Times photographers offer a glimpse into what inspires their best visual reporting.

January 19, 2013 at 9:19 PM

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Art of light and movement on display at Vermillion


BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Daniel Rowan Ellis-Walker, 6, of Seattle spins transparent discs on a glowing interactive art piece entitled "This is a Present from a Small Distant World" by Jeff Larson and kEvin Friberg. Works from various artists lit up the night at the opening of "Oscillate: Art Celebrating Light and Movement" at Vermillion, an art gallery and cafe in Capitol Hill, Seattle Thursday, January 10. Many of the artists, like co-curator Shelly Farnham, work at local tech companies. "Technologists are creatives. It's just a different kind of creative," Farnham said. She works at Microsoft on innovation and social media research and also identifies herself as an artist. "It's a labor of love. You spend so many hours writing software just to process artistic images." Dorkbot, a Seattle group centered around art, technology and science also helped put on the show, which is on display through February 8.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

People jam in the front lobby of Vermillion in Capitol Hill on opening night.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The walls of Vermillion are lit with glowing art creations.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Jon Behrens of Seattle, a northwest filmmaker, takes a movie on his iPhone of "Light Emitting Diodes are Killing Me," an azure blue neon and argon gas piece by Shellee Miggins. On the artist's statement, Miggins argues for the effectiveness of neon as a green lighting source. She writes, "Campaigns for LED lighting state that they are a greener solution to modern lighting needs. The combination of manufacturing plants in China, plastic materials, shipping and distributing, and their life expectancy, make me wonder how this could be true. It seems they are just another toxic landfill product in a throwaway society. Neon, if done professionally, is a long-burning, recyclable and beautiful lighting source."

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Bryan Ressler of Redmond created "Anthrolume," a wearable suit of over 250 computer-controlled LEDs and wore it to Burning Man, but it was too much of a project to put on at the opening. Ressler, a software engineer at eBay Research Labs, created the suit in four months.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mahalie Junior Stackpole, 2, checks out the lights on "Robot Marilyn" by Shelly Farnham, Morgan Hammer and Greg Larson. It is made out of steel, addressable RGB lights, and an Arduino. The addressable RGB lights are controlled with the Arduino, which can control each light individually. The software in the Arduino was programmed to mimic layers of sine waves, emulating the fluttering of Marilyn Monroe's famous white dress.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

"There is no real original thought," said Ben Flaster, an engineer from Burien, who created "Tesla's Corpse." The sculpture is a statement about work stemming from the result of previous efforts. "Flies feed off the corpse the way that everyone feeds off other inventions."

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

"A Frock of Crows" by Briar Bates greets visitors when they walk in to Vermillion.

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