Skip to main content
Advertising

Picture This

Seattle Times photographers offer a glimpse into what inspires their best visual reporting.

October 28, 2012 at 7:00 AM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

Last days of The Funhouse punk rock bar


ERIKA SCHULTZ/ THE SEATTLE TIMES

"Red," from the Japanese punk band Peelander-Z, crowd surfs during a recent show at The Funhouse. The punk rock club and dive bar, known for its affordable shows seven-nights-a-week and eclectic underground bands, is closing its doors on Oct. 31. The venue, located near the Space Needle, will be demolished to make way for a seven-story apartment building. The Funhouse opened in 2003, and has been a bar for 65 years, said employee Cyndi Goodman, married to owner Brian Foss. "A lot of bands get their first shows here," Goodman said. "We have live music here every night and we're able to take a chance on them." The owners currently are looking for a new location. "We'll find another place to sell booze and have music," Goodman said.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

In the early morning hours, music fans spill out of The Funhouse, located at 206 5th Ave N., near the Space Needle. Doorman Beau Vinek created the iconic clown "Spike."

ERIKA SCHULTZ/ THE SEATTLE TIMES

Crowd members cheer during the recent Peelander-Z show at The Funhouse. Employee Cyndi Goodman said the venue has hosted thousands of unique bands, including ones that performed legal wedding ceremonies on stage and others that have played nude.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Yellow from Peelander-Z performs during a recent show at The Funhouse. The building has been a bar for the past 65 years, said employee Cyndi Goodman.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Brad Weber, from left, Tambre Massan and Chris Leher talk outside the The Funhouse. "A majority of my happy moments in Seattle have happened at the Funhouse," Weber said. "It's a family of people who don't necessarily fit into a round hole, or those that do but want to get away from their cookie cutter life for awhile and feel free to drink some cheap beer and get into a mosh put full of smiling faces..."

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Crowd members dance during the Peelander-Z concert at The Funhouse. Bands and fans are sharing memories, music and photos on the Facebook page "My Band Started at the Funhouse."

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A member of Peelander-Z fist bumps with Brian Foss, owner of The Funhouse and one of the DJs for KEXP's Sonic Reducer.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Electric Eel Shock, a Japanese garage metal band, performs at The Funhouse, located near the Space Needle.

ERIKA SCHULTZ/ THE SEATTLE TIMES

Peelander-Z clears the floor for antics during a recent show at The Funhouse.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Mallory Pohlman, left, and Nick Greene play pinball while listening to the band the "Bottlenose Koffins" at The Funhouse.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Akihihiko Naruse watches Electric Eel Shock, a Japanese garage metal band, during their recent show at The Funhouse.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Peelander-Z performs at a recent show at The Funhouse in Seattle. The Funhouse will have its final show on Halloween.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Peelander-Z performs at a recent show at The Funhouse in Seattle. The Funhouse will have its final show on Halloween.

ERIKA SCHULTZ/ THE SEATTLE TIMES

Peelander-Z performs at a recent show at The Funhouse in Seattle. The band plays in costumes and offers the crowd pans and sticks to play during the performance.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Gradie Wallen films during a recent show at The Funhouse. Wallen, once a member of the band "Go Like Hell," said he enjoyed the period when the venue didn't have a stage. "The minute the band starting playing, a beer would hit the floor and the place would turn into a skating rink," he said. He recalls a show when the lead singer of his band fell down, head-butted a guy and knocked out his tooth. The singer then took the tooth in her mouth and swallowed it, Wallen said.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Crowd members play pots and pans during the Peelander-Z show at The Funhouse.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Bartenders Laura Hale, left, and Joanna Hewitt hug at The Funhouse at the end of the night. "I'm super grateful I got to work there," Hale said. "Everyone there is your family. Even if you don't know the person, by the time you leave you're going to get a hug at the door."

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

PREVIOUS POSTS

Advertising