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Originally published May 10, 2013 at 10:14 AM | Page modified May 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM

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Whether its good design or Mother's Day you're celebrating today, Goddess has the goods

Chandeliers from industrial pipes, a doghouse of fine design and rugs made from old belts. It's a little bit of everything.

Pacific NW associate editor

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TODAY WE celebrate two things, great design in this, our Spring Home Design issue, and Mother's Day. And if you are a mother who is fond of fabulously designed homes, it's a win-win. So happy Mother's Day of great design!

The beltway

Just where do old belts go to die? A lot of times they go to Goodwill, where they just hang around: The hand-tooled cowboy belt next to the furry leopard-print belt, next to the shiny alligator belt.

Now they've got a chance for a new life as a rug or, perhaps, wall art. EcoDomo's Phoenix Leather Collection. "Artistic," says marketing material. "Downright clever," says Goddess.

Five standard sizes of panels ranging from 6 inches by 48 inches to 48 inches by 48 inches. Area rugs are rectangular or circular up to 5 feet by 8 feet. Black, brown or multicolor.

EcoDomo is a sustainable supplier of recycled hide leathers and cork. The belts in their rugs come from Goodwill stores in New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Company is known for recycled leather, especially for its tiles for floors and walls made of scraps from BMW car seats and tanneries.

Panels (wall art, door inserts, shelf backs) and rugs cost about $80 to $120 per square foot. Find at www.ecodomo.com and locally at California Closets, 1018 116th Ave. N.E., Suite 170, Bellevue.

In the doghouse, with style

Blame it on the dog.

Kim Boltz got one last year. Standard schnauzer, Ege. Crate trained him. Then it started: The loathing for that uuuugly plastic crate sucking up the real estate in Boltz's smallish Ballard living room. What to do?

Boltz found few options in the modern dog-crate world. So, being an interior designer, she came up with one of her own: Apoochment — a real piece of functioning human furniture (coffee table, end table, stools) that also serves Fido's desire for a den.

Four sizes, from the stool for toy breeds ($550) to the end table for large dogs ($700). Made locally (finished in Auburn, manufactured in Seattle, and HQ, of course, Ballard). Walnut or African mahogany with maple or laminate (white or red) sliding doors. Two cutout patterns for sliding doors. No formaldehyde or toxic finishes.

Find at www.apoochment.com. Free delivery in Western Washington.

Gritty city lighting

Being a lawyer is not all fun and games. For Mr. Michael McHale, New York entertainment attorney, it was no fun and games. It was that dissatisfaction, plus a desire for a new light fixture for his apartment, that brought us this: Michael McHale Designs. Chandeliers made from industrial pipes drenched in fine crystals. A little bit Home Depot, a little bit Zsa Zsa Gabor.

You'll find them in all the best places, from Aspen ski houses to Taipei living rooms — even a Harley Davidson showroom. But now, there are lights industrial chic for the rest of us: the Tribeca Collection (more affordable!). Made from half-inch black steel pipe and European crystals. Hang them alone or by the bunch to amp up the glamour factor.

A starter Tribeca chandelier begins at $176 for a single bulb, up to $1,860. Check them out at www.michaelmchaledesigns.com. Some pieces available at www.ylighting.com and www.lightology.com.

Reach out to The Goddess at bteagarden@seattletimes.com. The Goddess is also very Pinteresting. Find her there at http://pinterest.com/rtea/.

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