Advertising

The Seattle Times Company

NWjobs | NWautos | NWhomes | NWsource | Free Classifieds | seattletimes.com

Pacific Northwest


Our network sites seattletimes.com | Advanced

Originally published December 25, 2010 at 10:00 PM | Page modified December 28, 2010 at 8:35 AM

Comments (0)     E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

Seattle Times Pictures of the Year 2010

AT A MOMENT in our culture when generalism is shunned and niche interests are celebrated, The Seattle Times still strives to be all things to all people. For proof, look no further than the images captured by the paper's photographers during a year that was rich with fascinating subject matter.

Join the Seattle Times photo editors and photojournalists on a journey through 2010 in an evening of conversation about capturing the moments that make up our lives at 7 p.m. Jan. 27, in the Microsoft Auditorium at the Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle.

Reprints of these Best of 2010 photos are available for purchase, digitally reproduced on archive-quality paper. To order visit seattletimes.nwsources.com/photography/buying

AT A MOMENT in our culture when generalism is shunned and niche interests are celebrated, The Seattle Times still strives to be all things to all people.

For proof, look no farther than the images captured by the paper's photographers during a year that was rich with fascinating subject matter.

While exploring the breaking news of this topsy-turvy year, the idiosyncrasies of our region and the particulars of the human condition, they have managed to tap into the universal: Joy and pain, elation and sorrow, achievement and yearning, amusement and no small dose of wide-eyed wonderment.

Steve Ringman's portrait of grief from a memorial service for the victims of an apartment fire in the Fremont neighborhood this spring, for instance, touches the soul not just because it's an arresting composition. It touches us because we all can relate to the agony on display.

In Erika Shultz's quietly moving portrait of a Haitian mother and her two sleeping sons on a refugee flight out of their earthquake-ravaged homeland, we sense the psychic toll that a natural disaster and subsequent dislocation can take.

Similarly, Jim Bates' image of a police officer moving in to stop a street brawl after last call in Belltown this summer taps into our shared sense of outrage over public-safety problems in an otherwise law-abiding city.

At the other end of the emotional spectrum, who can't root for Snohomish High School football player Ike Ditzenberger, who has Down syndrome, after seeing Mark Harrison's joyous image of him celebrating his touchdown for the Panthers?

Likewise, the excitement captured by Ellen M. Banner of newly minted U.S. citizen Kadhimia Shuhel, an Iraqi native, during a naturalization ceremony on July 4, is infectious.

And even if you don't follow sports, it's easy to identify with the sense of shared accomplishment in Dean Rutz's shot of fans grasping at the Seattle Storm's WNBA championship trophy.

The mark of great journalism is not just great newsgathering.

We also have to be able to see what our subjects see and feel what they feel, then depict those things in such a way that you, the reader, see and feel them, too.

Tyrone Beason is a Pacific Northwest magazine staff writer.

E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

More Pacific NW

Seattle's parks in peril: the choices are to shrink, skimp or pay up

Taste: Muffuletta sandwiches are the Big Easy's best

Plant Life: Seattle's Fisher House offers a place of peace

NEW - 7:00 PM
Wine Adviser: Some good Washington wineries got away

Destinations - A Traveler's Glimpse: Earth Hour: lights out to make a difference

More Pacific NW headlines...

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Comments
No comments have been posted to this article.

advertising

Video

Advertising

AP Video

Entertainment | Top Video | World | Offbeat Video | Sci-Tech

Marketplace

Always use your turn signal, and here's whynew
Dear Car Talk: My husband insists that he does not have to use turn signals if he is in a designated turn lane. I disagree, and we argue about...
Post a comment

Advertising