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Originally published Wednesday, May 14, 2014 at 5:55 PM

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Fishing report | More trout plantings mean lakes are a hot ticket

Here’s a look at local lakes you might want to check out.


Seattle Times staff reporter

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Opportunities continue to grow with more lakes getting trout plants to boost fishing action.

“Our intent is to make sure more fish are available to anglers, and this just extends the fishery into June and possibly July,” said Justin Spinelli, a state Fish and Wildlife Puget Sound regional biologist. “Many of these fish will also be around later in the fall so it should be very exciting.”

King County lakes planted between May 5-7 were Beaver with 4,688 trout; Echo, 1,213; Green, 4,002; Alice, 2,059; Desire, 7,373; Meridian, 3,000; Pine, 1,032; Shadow, 5,000; and Spring, 7,000.

In Snohomish County, Ballinger on May 5 received 2,036 trout; and Flowing got 3,089. In Grays Harbor County, Duck was planted May 7 with 2,200.

In Island County, Cranberry on May 5 got 4,232. In Pierce County, Bradley was planted May 2 with 1,000; Crescent on May 5 got 1,700; and Kapowsin on May 5 had a plant of 10,000. In Thurston County, Lawrence received 3,819 on May 7. In Clallam County, Wentworth got 6,500 on May 6.

State Fish and Wildlife will also conduct some plants near Father’s Day in some lakes to boost early summer fishing.

The kokanee bite has been good at Lake Stevens in Snohomish County. The Lake Stevens Kokanee Derby is this Saturday. Details: 425-335-1391. American, Meridian, Summit, Roesiger, Cavanaugh and Samish are all worthwhile kokanee lakes.

Razor clam digging is excellent at Twin Harbors, which is open through Tuesday; Long Beach is open through Sunday; Copalis is open Friday to Sunday; and Mocrocks is open Saturday and Sunday. More digs are also planned May 27-June 1, and will be finalized once marine toxin testing is approved, usually about a week before the first digging date.

The spot shrimp season has ended in many areas of Puget Sound, but state Fish and Wildlife will reopen the east side of Whidbey Island in the Everett/Saratoga Passage area on Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Hood Canal is open for spot shrimp on Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and Discovery Bay is open Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Neah Bay, eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca and southern Puget Sound are open daily for spot shrimp, and will close when the quota is achieved or Sept. 15, whichever comes first. The exception is South Sound, which closes May 31.

The San Juan Islands East, South and West areas are open Wednesday through May 24 and May 28-31. In the West area only, fishing will be open daily beginning June 1 until the quota is reached or Sept. 15, whichever comes first.

The hatchery spring chinook fishery will reopen Thursday through June 15 in the Lower Columbia River.

The updated in-season run projection is now 224,000 upriver spring chinook compared to a preseason forecast of 227,000.

Daily limit is two adult salmon or steelhead – or one of each – but no more than one adult hatchery-marked spring chinook.

Lower Columbia River anglers have caught 10,084 upriver spring chinook through last Saturday, when the previous two-day extension ended. The extension through mid-June is projected to boost the annual catch by 3,864.

Fishing Report
Location Comment
Marine areas

“We sampled this past week, and saw a lot of halibut (one-fish daily) limits at Ilwaco, and it has been very good at Westport too,” said Wendy Beeghly, a State Fish and Wildlife biologist.

Ilwaco is open for halibut Thursday to Sunday only; Westport is open Sunday and Tuesday only. La Push and Neah Bay open Sunday for halibut. There are two brief openings Friday and Saturday, and May 23-24 for hatchery-marked chinook off La Push and Neah Bay that will coincide with the halibut fishery. Sekiu opens for halibut May 22-25, May 29-31 and June 7. The eastern Strait, San Juan Islands, east side of Whidbey Island and northern and central Puget Sound will open for halibut on Saturday, May 22-25, May 29-31 and June 7 only. Most marine areas are closed for salmon except southern Puget Sound, which is open for hatchery chinook. The Edmonds Pier is open for salmon.

Biting: YesRating: 3 stars
Statewide riversFair to good for spring chinook at Drano Lake at Little White Salmon River mouth (Drano is closed every Wednesday through June), Wind and Klickitat from Fisher Hill Bridge downstream (open Monday, Wednesday and weekends). Good for spring chinook and steelhead in the Cowlitz. Fair for steelhead and spring chinook in the Kalama. Good for walleye and bass in The Dalles and John Day pools.
Biting: YesRating: 2 stars
Statewide lakesFair to good for trout at Margaret, Deer, North, Cottage, Geneva, Hicks, Aberdeen, Mineral, Padden and Wilderness. In Eastern Washington, target trout at Coffeepot, Fishtrap, Williams, Rocky, Diamond, Warden, and Conconully Lake and Reservoir. Good at Potholes Reservoir for walleye, bass and trout. Lake Chelan is good for lake trout and kokanee. Slow to fair for cutthroat trout in Lake Washington. Anderson Lake south of Port Townsend is closed to fishing until further notice due to a toxic algae bloom.
Biting: YesRating: 3 stars

Mark Yuasa: 206-464-8780

or myuasa@seattletimes.com



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