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Originally published Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 7:45 PM

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11 former teammates testified against Armstrong

Lance Armstrong said he wanted to see the names of his accusers. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency gave him 26, including 11 former teammates...

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I'm not surprised that he was the ring leader and it's disgusting to see him blatantly... MORE

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Lance Armstrong said he wanted to see the names of his accusers. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency gave him 26, including 11 former teammates.

The world's most famous cyclist said he wanted to see the hard evidence that he was a doper. The agency gave him that, too: About 200 pages filled with vivid details — from the hotel rooms riders transformed into makeshift blood-transfusion centers to the way Armstrong's former wife rolled cortisone pills into foil and handed them out to all the cyclists.

In all, a USADA report released Wednesday gives the most detailed, unflinching portrayal yet of Armstrong as a man who, day after day, week after week, year after year, spared no expense — financially, emotionally or physically — to win the seven Tour de France titles the anti-doping agency has ordered taken away. Armstrong won the Tour de France every year from 1999 to 2005.

USADA said the path Armstrong chose to pursue his goals "ran far outside the rules."

It accuses him of depending on performance-enhancing drugs to fuel his victories and "more ruthlessly, to expect and to require that his teammates" do the same.

The teammates who came forward and submitted sworn affidavits included some of the best cyclists of Armstrong's generation: Levi Leipheimer, Tyler Hamilton and George Hincapie, one of the most respected U.S. riders in recent history. Others: Frankie Andreu, Michael Barry, Tom Danielson, Floyd Landis, Stephen Swart, Christian Vande Velde, Jonathan Vaughters and David Zabriskie.

USADA chief executive Travis Tygart said the cyclists were part of "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen."

Armstrong did not fight the USADA charges but insists he never cheated.

His attorney, Tim Herman, called the report "a one-sided hatchet job."

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