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Originally published Friday, March 30, 2012 at 7:31 PM

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Knee injury causes Rafael Nadal to withdraw | Tennis

Rafael Nadal, ranked second in the world, withdrew hours before the start of his semifinal tennis match at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., because of a knee injury.

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Tennis

Knee injury causes Nadal

to withdraw in Key Biscayne

Rafael Nadal's knee trouble has sidelined him again, and the Spaniard hopes for a quick recovery to avoid missing any of the upcoming clay-court season.

Nadal, ranked second in the world, withdrew hours before the start of his semifinal match Friday at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., because of a left-knee injury that bothered him in recent matches.

With his withdrawal, 2009 champion Andy Murray of Britain advanced to Sunday's final.

Murray will play top-ranked Novak Djokovic of Serbia. Djokovic beat 21st-seeded Juan Monaco of Argentina 6-0, 7-6 (7-5) in a semifinal match.

Nadal, 25, said his knee has been getting worse and extensive treatment Thursday failed to help. His withdrawal left the tournament without a singles match for the afternoon session.

"I am very sorry for the fans," Nadal said. "I'm very sorry for the tournament. I'm very sorry for everybody who was ready to watch the match on the television, for television, for everybody."

Swimming

Adrian sets another meet record

Nathan Adrian of Bremerton set his second meet record in two days when he took the 50-meter freestyle in 21.88 seconds at the Indianapolis Grand Prix.

Adrian edged George Bovell, whose time was 21.89. In the morning preliminaries, Bovell set a meet record of 22.15 that didn't last long.

On Thursday, Adrian — who split his trunks on the starting blocks — beat superstar Michael Phelps in the 100 free in 48.62.

Figure skating

Chan wins men's short program

Canadian Patrick Chan stayed on his feet and on course to retain his title at the world championships in Nice, France, winning the short program despite almost tumbling backward to the ice.

Chan was betrayed by his usually sure footwork coming out of a camel spin, twice swaying back before regaining his balance in time.

"I was kind of upset at myself for not keeping it together," he said.

Chan had done enough with cleanly executed jumps to secure a season's best score of 89.41 points heading into Saturday's free skate.

Czech skater Michal Brezina, celebrating his 22nd birthday, was second with 87.67 points.

Defending champions Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Germany earned their fourth pairs world title.

College football

Prosecutors file documents

in Penn State perjury case

Prosecutors filed a document listing 33 statements made by two Penn State administrators to support the perjury charges against the men, accused of lying to a grand jury investigating child sex abuse allegations against former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

A second document defended the case and said a judge should not dismiss the charges.

The statements laid out by the state attorney general's office are from January 2011, when athletic director Tim Curley and former vice president Gary Schultz appeared before a secret grand jury investigating Sandusky.

Sandusky, 68, awaits trial on dozens of child sexual abuse charges involving 10 boys over a 15-year period. He has denied the allegations and is on house arrest awaiting trial in June.

Montana picks interim coach

Montana has selected associate head coach Mick Delaney to serve as the interim coach after the firing of Robin Pflugrad.

School officials also picked Jean Gee as interim athletic director after Jim O'Day's dismissal.

The firings of Pflugrad, an ex-Washington State assistant, and O'Day were preceded by six months of tumult for Montana and its football program, which was dealing with sexual-assault allegations against two players.

Olympics

IOC concludes inspection visit

With the opening ceremony less than four months away, the International Olympic Committee is confident the London Games will deliver a "summer like no other" in Britain.

The IOC's coordination commission wrapped up its 10th and final inspection visit to London and offered praise to local organizers on their preparations for the July 27 to Aug. 12 Olympics.

"London is ready to welcome the world," commission chairman Denis Oswald said. "We can feel that London is feeling the fever of the Games."

A group of protesters, meanwhile, demonstrated nearby against Olympic sponsor Dow Chemical over its links to the 1984 Bhopal gas-leak disaster in India. London officials received a petition signed by more than 25,000 people, and organizing committee chief Sebastian Coe said he was willing to meet with the group.

Skiing

Mancuso collects 14th U.S. title

Julia Mancuso of Squaw Valley, Calif., won the super-giant slalom title at the U.S. championships in Winter Park, Colo.

Olympic gold medalist Mancuso, 28, has won a record 14 national championships, four in Super-G.

"It's always fun to win U.S. titles. But I think I want 30," said Mancuso, laughing.

Mancuso won in 1 minute, 10.38 seconds and Leanne Smith of North Conway, N.H., was a distant second, 1.2 seconds behind.

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