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Originally published Saturday, May 10, 2014 at 6:12 AM

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The week’s passages

A roundup of notable obituaries for the week ending May 10.


Billy Frank Jr., 83, a Nisqually tribal member whose decades-long battle with authorities over treaty rights to catch fish propelled him to the forefront of one of the Northwest’s greatest civil-rights movements, died Monday at his Olympia-area home. A charismatic statesman for tribal rights, he traveled the country and the world and became one of the nation’s most influential Native Americans.

Farley Mowat, 92, one of Canada’s most popular and prolific writers, who became a champion of wildlife and native Canadian rights and a sharp critic of environmental abuse, died Tuesday in Port Hope, Ontario.

William Harvey Dana, 83, he famed test pilot who helped usher in the Space Age in the 1960s by routinely flying rocket planes to new supersonic speeds and stratospheric heights, died Tuesday near Phoenix from Parkinson’s disease.

Gary Becker, 83, a Nobel Prize-winning economist who expanded the scope of his field to address a variety of social issues, including family relations and discrimination, died May 3 in Chicago of complications from surgery.

George H. Heilmeier, 77, an electrical engineer for RCA who in the 1960s helped invent a screen display that used liquid crystals to project images — technology now ubiquitous in telephones, digital watches, computer monitors and flat-screen televisions — died of Alzheimer’s disease April  21 in Plano, Texas.

Arthur Oakes, 74, of Keystone, S.D., who drew national attention in the mid-1990s when he paid to keep the lights on at Mount Rushmore National Memorial during a federal government shutdown, died of pancreatic cancer Monday.

Cornelius Gurlitt, 81, whose long-secret hoard of 1,280 major artworks was seized last year and set off an international uproar over the fate of art looted by the Nazis, died Tuesday in his Munich apartment. He had recently had heart surgery.

Sheikh Muhammad Nazim Adil al-Qubrusi al-Haqqani, 92, praised as one of the world’s great Islamic scholars and a spiritual leader to followers of Sufism, the mystical branch of the Islamic faith, died Wednesday in the north of ethnically divided Cyprus.

Lee Marshall, 64, a voice­over artist whose magnificent bass rang out as Tony the Tiger on cereal commercials since 1999, and who also worked as a sports broadcaster, rock ‘n’ roll deejay and wrestling announcer, died of esophageal cancer April 26 in Santa Monica, Calif.

Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, 69, a conservative journalist and former top editor of Reader’s Digest who used his leadership role in federal communications agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, to counter what he regarded as liberal bias, died of melanoma May 1 in Winchester, Va.

Glen H. Stassen, 78, a Southern Baptist theologian who helped define the social-justice wing of the evangelical movement in the 1980s, died of cancer April 25 in Pasadena, Calif.

Jimmy Ellis, 74, a sparring partner for Muhammad Ali who captured the heavyweight boxing championship after it had been stripped from Ali for his refusal of the military draft, died Tuesday in Louisville, Ky. He had Alzheimer’s disease.



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