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Originally published Saturday, April 26, 2014 at 6:04 AM

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The week’s passages

A roundup of notable obituaries from the week ending April 26.


Mark Prothero, 57, a former champion swimmer at the University of Washington and a well-regarded attorney for decades, who spent years defending Green River serial killer Gary L. Ridgway and keeping him from being executed, died at his Kent-area home April 19. He had been battling lung cancer.

Earl Morrall, 79, who famously saved the Miami Dolphins’ perfect season in 1972-73 by stepping in at quarterback when the starter was injured, and who won three Super Bowl rings in 21 years as an NFL quarterback, died Friday. He had been in declining health. No further details were available.

U Win Tin, a journalist, author and poet who became a leading opponent of the military rulers of Myanmar, where he was imprisoned and tortured for 19 years, died Monday in Yangon. Sources differ on whether he was 84 or 85. News reports said his kidneys and other organs had failed.

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, 76, a star prizefighter whose career was cut short by a murder conviction in New Jersey and who became an international cause célèbre while imprisoned for 19 years before the charges against him were dismissed, died of prostate cancer last Sunday in Toronto.

Conrado “Connie” Marrero, 102, a cherished figure in Cuban baseball who was also the oldest former U.S. major-leaguer (he pitched for the Washington Senators), died Wednesday in Havana, two days short of his 103rd birthday.

Doris Pilkington Garimara, 76, a writer whose book “Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence” told her own family’s experience of Australia’s mistreatment of its native Aborigines, died of ovarian cancer April 10 in Perth.

Gene Estess, 78, who left his Wall Street career to lead the Jericho Project, which serves homeless, mentally ill and addicted people in Harlem and the South Bronx, died of cancer April 9 in Brooklyn.

Adrianne Wadewitz, 37, a digital scholar and one of Wikipedia’s most valued and prolific contributors, a force for diversifying its ranks and demystifying its inner workings, died April 8 in Palm Springs, Calif., 10 days after a fall while rock climbing.

Myles Malman, 67, a federal prosecutor known for the drug-trafficking case against Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega in Miami, died of brain cancer last Sunday in Hollywood, Fla.

Alistair MacLeod, 77, the award-winning Canadian author best known for his short-story collections and novel “No Great Mischief,” died last Sunday in Windsor, Ontario, of a stroke.

Mark Shand, 62, the brother of Prince Charles’ wife, Camilla, died Wednesday after falling outside a hotel and suffering a head injury. The British travel writer and conservationist was in New York for a charity auction.

John C. Houbolt, 95, an engineer whose contributions to the U.S. space program were vital to NASA’s successful moon landing in 1969, died April 15 in Scarborough, Maine.

Phillip Hayes Dean, 83, a playwright whose portrait of the actor and social crusader Paul Robeson aroused one of the theater’s more unusual controversies and derailed his own promising career (he never published or produced another play), died of an aortic aneurysm April 14 in Los Angeles.

Kevin Sharp, 43, a country-music singer who recorded chart-topping songs and survived a well-publicized battle with cancer, died April 19 in Fair Oaks, Calif., of complications from past surgeries and digestive ills.



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