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Originally published February 22, 2014 at 6:12 AM | Page modified February 22, 2014 at 7:09 PM

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The week’s passages

A roundup of the week’s notable obituaries


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Chad Kellogg, 42, of Seattle, an elite climber known for his speed ascents of large mountains, died Feb. 14 when he was struck on the head by a falling rock while descending the Patagonian peak Fitz Roy, in Argentina.

Ed O’Brien, 83, a Seattle University basketball and baseball star who with his twin, John, also played with the Pittsburgh Pirates, and who finished his career as an S.U. coach and athletic director, died Friday. No cause was announced.

Walter D. Ehlers, 92, who received the Medal of Honor for his exploits as an Army sergeant in the D-Day invasion of France and came to personify the heroism of the GIs who stormed the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, died Thursday in Long Beach, Calif.

Miroslav Standera, 95, a fighter pilot who fled the takeover of Czechoslovakia in 1939 to fight for the French and then British air forces in World War II, died Wednesday in the Czech Republic city of Plzen.

Dick Cabela, 77, co-founder of the Cabela’s sporting-goods empire — with $3.1 billion in sales in 2012 from mail order and stores — died Monday in Sidney, Neb. No cause was given.

Mavis Gallant, 91, an acclaimed short-story writer who was abandoned as a child and later left Canada for Europe, where she made her name writing about the dislocated and the dispossessed, died Tuesday at her home in Paris.

Garrick Utley, 74, a former anchor for NBC News who for many years was one of a rare breed in TV reporting, a full-time foreign correspondent, died of prostate cancer Thursday in Manhattan.

Tom Finney, 91, who scored 30 goals in 76 soccer matches for England, including appearances at three World Cups, and was knighted in 1998, died Feb. 14. No location was given.

Simon Diaz, 85, known as “Uncle Simon,” a Venezuelan folk singer-songwriter considered a national treasure, united the government and its opponents in paying homage this past week when his daughter confirmed he had died. No details were given.

Bob Casale, 61, a guitarist who was an original member of the rock band Devo, died Monday of what his brother and fellow band member Gerald Casale said was “conditions that led to heart failure.” He provided no further details.

Alison Jolly, 76, an American-born primatologist whose research in the forests of Madagascar shed new light on the evolution of social intelligence and helped disprove a longstanding scientific tenet that males were dominant in every primate species, died of breast cancer Feb. 6 in Lewes, East Sussex, England.

Horst Rechelbacher, 72, an Austrian immigrant who founded the beauty-products company Aveda, an international brand known for its eco-friendly practices, died of pancreatic cancer Feb. 15 in Osceola, Wis.

Lewis Yablonsky, 89, who outgrew an adolescence of petty crimes to gain national prominence as a sociologist, criminologist and author, died Jan. 29 of natural causes at his home in Santa Monica, Calif.

Mary Grace Canfield, 89, a character actress best known as part of the daffy Ralph-and-Alf brother-sister carpenter team on the TV comedy “Green Acres,” died of lung cancer Feb. 15 in Santa Barbara, Calif.

John Henson, 48, who occasionally performed as a puppeteer in the famed Muppets troupe his father founded, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in Saugerties, N.Y.

Toshiko d’Elia, 84, who emerged from the destitution of postwar Japan to achieve renown in the U.S. as a marathon runner, starting competing at age 44 in the 1970s, died of brain cancer Wednesday in Allendale, N.J. She was also a teacher of the deaf.



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