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Originally published January 19, 2013 at 11:24 AM | Page modified January 25, 2013 at 1:23 PM

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Corrected version

The week’s passages

A roundup of the week’s notable obituaries.

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Wai Chow Eng, 83, a Chinese immigrant who graduated from Highline High and served as an Army interpreter in the Korean War, then built a life as a restaurant owner (including the Kau Kau), Chinatown International District investor and developer, community leader and a leader of the Eng Family Benevolent Association, his ancestral family organization, died Jan. 4 in Seattle of natural causes.

Pauline Friedman Phillips, 94, who as Dear Abby (short for Abigail Van Buren) dispensed snappy, sometimes saucy advice on love, marriage and meddling mothers-in-law to millions of newspaper readers around the world and opened the way for the likes of Dr. Ruth, Dr. Phil and Oprah, died Wednesday in Minneapolis. She had Alzheimer’s disease. Her daughter, Jeanne Phillips, took over the column in 2002.

Earl Weaver, 82, a baseball Hall of Famer, the Baltimore Orioles’ irascible, chain-smoking, umpire-baiting manager who led the team to four American League pennants and the 1970 world championship in 17 years, died Friday while on a baseball-themed Caribbean cruise.

Dyer Brainerd Holmes, 91, a multitalented engineer who directed NASA’s manned-spaceflight program in the early 1960s and who was instrumental in developing the plan that sent the first astronauts to the moon, died Jan. 11 in Memphis, Tenn.

James Hood, 70, of Gadsden, Ala., one of the first black students who enrolled at the University of Alabama in 1963 in defiance of racial segregation, died Thursday. After a few months he moved to Michigan to get his bachelor’s and master’s degrees. He returned to UA for his doctorate later in life.

Eugene Patterson, 89, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editor and columnist at the Atlanta Constitution who helped fellow Southern whites understand the civil-rights movement, and who later was managing editor of The Washington Post and editor of The St. Petersburg Times, died of prostate cancer Jan. 12 in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Leon Leyson, 83, a retired public schoolteacher who at 13 was one of the youngest of 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by Oskar Schindler, died of lymphoma Jan. 12 in Whittier, Calif.

Yang Baibing, 93, a veteran Chinese revolutionary and a military strongman who carried out the violent suppression of student-led protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989 and was later purged because of fears that he was accruing too much power, died Tuesday in Beijing. No cause was given.

Ralph G. Martin, 92, a best-selling author of political and celebrity biographies whose subjects included the Kennedys, Golda Meir and Winston Churchill’s mother, died Jan. 9 in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.

Conrad Bain, 89, who portrayed the white millionaire father in the hit TV sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes,” alongside such scene-stealing young co-stars as Gary Coleman, died Monday of natural causes in Livermore, Calif.

Yuri M. Schmidt, 75, a human-rights lawyer who represented critics of the Russian government and others accused of political crimes, died of cancer Jan. 12 in St. Petersburg.

Daniel J. Edelman,92, who started a small public-relations firm that grew into the country’s largest, and who created a number of successful gimmicks, including the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, died Tuesday in Chicago.

In earlier versions of this column, Leon Leyson, one of 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by Oskar Schindler, was reported as the youngest person on Schindler’s List. The Associated Press has since corrected itself, reporting that experts say Leyson was one of the youngest survivors on the list, but because records were lost and parents lied about birth dates to protect children, definitive records of the youngest survivor are unavailable.

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