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February 7, 2013 at 4:00 PM

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America's falling fertility rate is not a problem

Overpopulation needs attention

I have no idea who Jonathan Last is and I don’t care [“Don’t fret the ‘baby bust,’ ” Opinion, Feb. 6].

The entire world is in trouble because of overpopulation. It never gets mentioned, kind of like ocean acidification never gets mentioned. Both trends taken together will end life as we know it, sometime in the future. So why worry about it now?

China is way out ahead of the rest of the planet on overpopulation — they say one child per family, yet they are miles away from full employment, and always will be. They have too many people.

The USA is miles away from full employment, too, for different reasons, but how will more people solve that? More people to work at Taco Bell? Do we need that?

I say free contraceptives to any woman, whether she wants them or not. And where’s that spermicidal injectable gel with a 10-year longevity for boys? That was supposed to be on the market by now. Why isn’t that a high school entrance requirement?

How much of our state and federal budgets goes to dealing with people having babies who shouldn’t? How much of those budgets goes to babies, kids and adults who don’t/didn’t have a loving, caring family that could take care of them?

Wake up and smell the diapers. The planet has too many people already.

--Robert Reed, Seattle


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