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Originally published July 1, 2014 at 8:56 PM | Page modified July 2, 2014 at 6:29 AM

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Rainbow gathering moves into Utah forest for annual festival

The Rainbow Family has convened every year since 1972, sometimes in two states at once, to join in prayers for peace, sing-alongs in the traveling Granola Funk theater and unkempt free-spiritedness.


The Associated Press

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SALT LAKE CITY — Thousands of young people and some more weathered hikers are trekking up a path that cuts through aspen and pine to a summit of a Utah mountain about 60 miles east of Salt Lake City.

The group includes train hoppers, students, lawyers, architects and others, members say. But each belongs to the Rainbow Family, which has convened every year since 1972, sometimes in two states at once, to join in prayers for peace, sing-alongs in the traveling Granola Funk theater and unkempt free-spiritedness that has irked some residents in neighboring Heber City.

“People call us misfits, drug addicts, homeless, useless. That’s not true,” said Red Carlin, a retired carpenter and unofficial ambassador for the group.

“Because of our existence, we’re outsiders. We’re the people your mom and dad pointed out beforehand and said, ‘Don’t be like that,’ ” Carliln said

The gathering is expected to double in size this week as more members pour in to the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest for a four-day celebration that ends Friday.

On Tuesday, some came in pairs, groups or by themselves in a variety of looks: dreadlocks, sundresses, with pets and dirt-caked faces.

Members began arriving about two weeks ago in Heber City, where residents say they’re wary of disorderly conduct and question how much the gathering will cost their town.

About 10,000 people are expected to arrive by Friday, the height of the celebration.

Last year, the same number of members set up camp in Montana. The group there racked up hundreds of thousands of dollars in law-enforcement costs, officials said.

The festival prompted U.S. Forest Service officials there to draw up a list of lessons learned for other states.

The Rainbow Family has no official creed or website, and it doesn’t publicly identify any leaders or list of members. It revolves around peace and nonviolence, various unofficial websites say.

Authorities say a New Hampshire woman and a man from Texas at the celebration apparently died in their sleep.

Police also say a New Mexico woman at the campsite last week stabbed a participant, seriously injuring him.



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