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Originally published June 28, 2014 at 2:23 PM | Page modified June 28, 2014 at 6:44 PM

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U.S. takes gay rights global, despite unsure welcome

With gay-pride parades taking place in many cities across the world this weekend, the U.S. role will be more visible than ever. Diplomats will take part in parades and some embassies will fly the rainbow flag along with the Stars and Stripes.


The Associated Press

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WARSAW, Poland — President Obama has taken the gay-rights revolution global, using U.S. embassies worldwide to promote a cause that still divides his own country.

With gay-pride parades taking place in many cities across the world this weekend, the U.S. role will be more visible than ever. Diplomats will take part in parades and some embassies will fly the rainbow flag along with the Stars and Stripes.

The United States sent five openly gay ambassadors abroad last year, with a sixth nominee, to Vietnam, awaiting Senate confirmation. American diplomats are working to support gay rights in countries such as Poland, where opposition is widespread, and to oppose violence and other abuse in countries such as Nigeria and Russia, where gays face life-threatening risks.

“It is incredible. I am amazed by what the U.S. is doing to help us,” said Mariusz Kurc, editor of a Polish gay-advocacy magazine, Replika, which has received some U.S. funding and other help. “We are used to struggling and not finding any support.”

Former President George W. Bush supported AIDS-prevention efforts globally, but it was the Obama administration that launched the push to make lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights an international issue. The watershed moment came in December 2011, when Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton went to the United Nations in Geneva and proclaimed LGBT rights “one of the remaining human-rights challenges of our time.”

Since then, embassies have been opening their doors to gay-rights activists, hosting events and supporting local advocacy work. The State Department has since spent $12 million on the efforts in more than 50 countries through the Global Equality Fund, an initiative launched to fund the new work.

Weeks after the Supreme Court struck down parts of the Defense of Marriage Act last June, consular posts also began issuing immigrant visas to the same-sex spouses of gay Americans.

One beneficiary was Jake Lees, 27, an Englishman who had been forced to spend long periods apart from his American partner, Austin Armacost, since they met six years ago. In May, Lees was issued a fiancé visa at the U.S. Embassy in London. The two married two weeks ago and are starting a new life together in Franklin, Ind., as they wait for Lees’ green card.

“I felt like the officers at the embassy treated us the way they would treat a heterosexual couple,” said Armacost, 26, a fitness and nutrition instructor. “It’s a mind-boggling change after gay couples were treated like legal strangers for the first three centuries of our country’s history.”

Some conservative U.S. groups are outraged by the policy. Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, calls it “a slap in the face to the majority of Americans,” given that American voters have rejected same-sex marriage in a number of state referendums.

“This is taking a flawed view of what it means to be a human being — male and female — and trying to impose that on countries throughout the world,” Brown said.

The U.S. efforts are tailored to local conditions, said Scott Busby, deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor at the State Department. Ambassadors can decide individually whether to hoist the rainbow flag, as embassies in Tel Aviv, London and Prague have done, or show support in other ways.

While some gay-rights activists say support from the U.S. and other Western countries adds moral legitimacy to their cause, it can also cause a backlash.

Rauda Morcos, a prominent Palestinian lesbian activist, said local communities, particularly in the Middle East, have to find their own ways of asserting themselves. She criticized the U.S. and Western efforts in general to help gay communities elsewhere as patronizing.

“It is a colonial approach,” she said. “In cases where it was tried, it didn’t help local communities and maybe made things even worse.”

An extreme case has been Uganda, which in February passed a law making gay sex punishable by a life sentence. In enacting the bill, President Yoweri Museveni said he wanted to deter the West from “promoting” gay rights in Africa, a continent where homosexuals face severe discrimination and even attacks. In response, the U.S. imposed sanctions, and Secretary of State John Kerry compared the policies to the anti-Semitic laws in Nazi Germany and apartheid in South Africa.

In Russia, President Vladimir Putin has waged an assault on what he considers the encroachment of decadent Western values, and the government last year banned “propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations among minors,” making it a crime to hold gay-rights rallies or to openly discuss homosexuality in content accessible to children. Afraid for their security, some Russian gay advocates try to keep their contacts with Western officials quiet.



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