Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published March 5, 2014 at 6:32 AM | Page modified March 5, 2014 at 10:30 PM

  • Share:
             
  • Comments (25)
  • Print

Giant virus revived after more than 30,000 years

Researchers have revived a giant virus more than 30,000 years old, recovered from the permafrost of northeast Siberia.


Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
This sounds like the great beginning of a horror movie scripted by Michael Crichton. MORE
Hey there's a giant virus! Let's wake it up and see what it does!! MORE
Reviving ancient virus...what could possibly go wrong with that? MORE

advertising

NEW YORK —

Researchers have revived a giant virus more than 30,000 years old, recovered from the permafrost of northeast Siberia.

The virus poses no threat to people. Although it is considered a giant when compared to other viruses, it is microscopic and infects amoebas.

The one from Siberia is a new kind of giant virus, joining a group that was first discovered 10 years ago.

The researchers said their finding suggests that dangerous germs might emerge in the future as permafrost thaws because of global warming or mineral exploration. They said sampling permafrost to look for ancient viruses that infect amoebas is an inexpensive and safe way to assess that potential threat.

The new work was reported Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.



Want unlimited access to seattletimes.com? Subscribe now!

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Where in the world are Seahawks fans?

Where in the world are Seahawks fans?

Put your marker on The Seattle Times interactive map and share your fan story.

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►