Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published February 25, 2014 at 9:09 PM | Page modified February 26, 2014 at 11:19 AM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (2)
  • Print

Crimeans look to Russia to protect Ukraine from Kiev ‘bandits’

Pro-Russian protesters rallied Tuesday in Crimea, bitterly denouncing politicians in Kiev who are trying to form a new government, with some even calling for secession from Ukraine.


The Associated Press

Crimea snapshot

Location: The Crimean Peninsula juts into the Black Sea, all but an island except for a strip of land connecting it to the mainland. It’s best known in the West as the site of the 1945 Yalta Conference, where Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill sealed the postwar division of Europe. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev gave the peninsula to Ukraine in 1954. Nearly 60 percent of its population of 2 million identify themselves as Russians.

Strategic interest: On Crimea’s southern shore sits the port city of Sevastopol, home to the Russian Black Sea Fleet and its thousands of naval personnel.

Tensions: The 1991 fall of the Soviet Union also brought the return of the Crimean Tatars, who had been brutally deported in 1944 under Stalin. The Crimean Tatars, who now make up about 12 percent of its population, have sided with the protesters in Kiev.

The Associated Press

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
In Kiev the terrorists drove away most East Ukrainian and Crimean members of parliament... MORE
Yet another bitter ethnic/political dispute in a country in which we have no direct... MORE

advertising

SEVASTOPOL, Ukraine — Dozens of pro-Russian protesters rallied Tuesday in this Crimean Peninsula city, bitterly denouncing politicians in Kiev who are trying to form a new government, with some even calling for secession from Ukraine. A Russian lawmaker stoked their passions by promising that Moscow will protect them.

“Russia, save us!” they chanted.

The outburst of pro-Russian sentiment in the strategic peninsula on the Black Sea, home to a Russian naval base, came amid fears of economic collapse for Ukraine as the fractious foes of President Viktor Yanukovych failed to reach agreement on forming a new national government and said the task of assigning posts could not be completed before Thursday.

While Ukraine’s politicians struggled to reorganize themselves in Kiev, a Russian flag had replaced the Ukrainian flag in front of the city council building in Sevastopol, 500 miles to the south of the capital. An armored personnel carrier and two trucks full of Russian troops made a rare appearance on the streets, vividly demonstrating Russian power in this port city where the Kremlin’s Black Sea Fleet is based.

Some called on Moscow to protect them from the movement that drove Yanukovych from the capital three days ago.

“Bandits have come to power,” complained Vyacheslav Tokarev, a 39-year-old construction worker. “I’m ready to take arms to fight the fascists who have seized power in Kiev.”

Yanukovych’s whereabouts are unknown, but he was reportedly last seen in the Crimea, the staunchly pro-Russian region the size of Massachusetts. Law-enforcement agencies have issued an arrest warrant for him over the killing of 82 people, mainly protesters, last week in the bloodiest violence in Ukraine’s post-Soviet history.

His former chief of staff, Andriy Klyuyev, was wounded by gunfire Monday and hospitalized, spokesman Artem Petrenko said. It wasn’t clear where in Ukraine the shooting took place or what were the circumstances of the shooting.

The pro-Moscow protesters gathered for a third day in front of administrative buildings in Sevastopol and in other Crimean cities. Protests Sunday numbered in the thousands.

“Only Russia will be able to protect the Crimea,” said Anatoly Mareta, wearing the colors of the Russian flag on his arm.

“I hope for the Ossetian way,” he added — a reference to the brief but fierce 2008 war in which Russian tanks and troops helped Georgia’s separatist provinces of South Ossetia and Abkhazia to break free. Russia has recognized both as independence states, but few other nations have.

Russia, which has thousands of Black Sea Fleet seamen at its base, so far has refrained from any sharp moves in Ukraine’s political turmoil, but it could be drawn into the fray if there are confrontations between the population in Crimea and the supporters of the new authorities.

A senior Russian lawmaker promised protesters that his government will protect its Russian-speaking compatriots in the southern and eastern parts of Ukraine that tilt heavily toward Moscow. “If lives and health of our compatriots are in danger, we won’t stay aside,” Leonid Slutsky told activists in Simferopol, the regional capital of Crimea.

Slutsky’s statements followed more cautious remarks by Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who said that Moscow has no intention of interfering in Ukraine’s domestic affairs, but he also warned the West against trying to take advantage of the situation.

Ukraine’s interim leader, Oleksandr Turchinov, met with top security officials Tuesday to discuss the tensions in Crimea and elsewhere. Russian President Vladimir Putin also summoned his top security officials Tuesday to discuss Ukraine, but no details were released.

Many in Russia have been dreaming about regaining the lush Crimean peninsula, which was conquered by Russia in the 18th century under Catherine the Great. Crimea only became part of Ukraine in 1954 when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev transferred jurisdiction from Russia. The move was a formality until the 1991 Soviet collapse meant Crimea landed in an independent Ukraine.

Ethnic Russians make up the majority of Crimea’s population, and some, including retired navy officers and their families, have Russian citizenship.

Turchinov, the parliament speaker, is now nominally in charge of this strategic country of 46 million whose ailing economy faces a possible default and whose loyalties are sharply torn between Europe and longtime ruler Russia.

Protests in Ukraine erupted after Yanukovych in November abruptly reject an agreement to strengthen ties with the European Union and, instead, sought a bailout loan from Moscow. But they grew into a massive movement demanding an end to corruption and greater human rights.



News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

The summer is wide open.

The summer is wide open.

Follow our three-part "Washington's National Parks" series running through August 10 for an in-depth look at some of our local treasures.

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►