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Originally published January 24, 2014 at 8:15 AM | Page modified January 24, 2014 at 8:46 AM

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Toll of Syria's devastation: The war, in numbers

DEAD: More than 130,000 people have been killed in Syria, according to the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The U.N. has given up counting, saying it could no longer do so with any accuracy.


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GENEVA —

DEAD: More than 130,000 people have been killed in Syria, according to the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The U.N. has given up counting, saying it could no longer do so with any accuracy.

REFUGEES: 2.3 million Syrians have official refugee status and 6.5 million others are displaced within Syria out of a total population of 23 million.

ECONOMY: Syria's GDP contracted 21.8 percent in 2012, 22.5 percent in 2013 and is projected to fall in 2014 by 8.6 percent.

INFLATION: Prices were up 212 percent from 2011 to mid-2013, possibly far higher in unstable areas.

OIL: Since 2010, production has fallen from 370,000 barrels a day to 60,000 barrels a day in December 2013.

REBEL FIGHTERS: Hundreds of rebel brigades are scattered throughout Syria, commanding an estimated 100,000 fighters. They range from moderate Syrians who took up arms at the rebellion's outset to hardline al-Qaida-linked insurgents now coming in from Europe, Iraq and elsewhere.

DISEASE: 40 percent of Syria's public hospitals are out of service due to the fighting. After officially eradicating polio in 1999, Syria just saw 17 confirmed cases of the disease.

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Source: UNHCR, World Bank, International Energy Agency, World Health Organization.



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