Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published December 11, 2013 at 2:59 PM | Page modified December 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

House votes to dig up veteran involved in homicide

The House passed legislation Wednesday that instructs the Veterans Affairs Department to unearth the remains of an Army veteran buried with military honors last year even after police said he killed an Indianapolis woman and injured three others before taking his own life.


Associated Press

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

advertising

WASHINGTON —

The House passed legislation Wednesday that instructs the Veterans Affairs Department to unearth the remains of an Army veteran buried with military honors last year even after police said he killed an Indianapolis woman and injured three others before taking his own life.

Current law prohibits military burials in national cemeteries for those who commit capital crimes, but it doesn't make provisions for removing a veteran who is buried in violation of that law.

That's what happened in the case of Michael LeShawn Anderson. He was buried in Michigan's Fort Custer National Cemetery in June 2012. Six days earlier, police said he fatally shot Alicia Dawn Koehl.

The VA said it found out about the circumstances surrounding Anderson's death only after he had been buried and it needed authorization from Congress to remedy the mistake.

Members of Indiana's congressional delegation obliged. The bill covers national cemeteries as well as Arlington National Cemetery, which is administered by the Army.

The Senate passed the same bill three weeks ago. It now goes to President Barack Obama for his signature.

Koehl was a constituent of Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Ind. She sponsored the House version of the legislation.

"I'm outraged not only that the Koehl family had had to endure yet another injustice ... but also that our brave service men and women, who in some cases have given the ultimate sacrifice to their nation, are buried next to a murderous criminal," Brooks said in urging lawmakers to vote for the bill.



News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Seattle Sketcher Book

Seattle Sketcher Book

Take home the Seattle Sketcher's latest book! Available now.

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►