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Originally published October 20, 2013 at 7:38 PM | Page modified October 21, 2013 at 6:37 AM

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U.S. military selling surplus gear as scrap in Afghanistan

The $5 billion to $7 billion the Pentagon has budgeted to ship gear back to the United States isn’t enough to take everything currently in Afghanistan, so the U.S. military decided to sell the leftovers — first destroyed — as scrap.


The Washington Post

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It wasn't too expensive to ship the stuff over there. MORE
Of course for the most part the real reason not to bring stuff back intact is there... MORE
And here in America, our government shut down for two weeks....what a pathetic waste... MORE

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BAGRAM, Afghanistan — The armored trucks, televisions, ice-cream scoops and nearly everything else shipped here for America’s war against the Taliban are now part of the world’s biggest garage sale. Every week, as the U.S. troop drawdown accelerates, the United States is selling 12 million to 14 million pounds of its equipment on the Afghan market.

Returning that gear to the United States from a landlocked country halfway around the world would be prohibitively expensive, according to U.S. officials. Instead, they’re leaving behind $7 billion worth of supplies, a would-be boon to the fragile Afghan economy.

But there’s one catch: The equipment is being destroyed before it’s offered to the Afghan people — to ensure that treadmills, air conditioning units and other rudimentary appliances aren’t used to make roadside bombs.

“Many nonmilitary items have timing equipment or other components in them that can pose a threat. For example, timers can be attached to explosives. Treadmills, stationary bikes, many household appliances and devices, et cetera, have timers,” said Michelle McCaskill, a spokeswoman for the Pentagon’s Defense Logistics Agency.

That policy has produced more scrap metal than Afghanistan has ever seen. It has also led to frustration among Afghans, who feel as if they’re being robbed of items like flat-panel televisions and armored vehicles that they could use or sell — no small thing in a country where the average annual income hovers at just over $500.

In a nation nicknamed the “graveyard of empires,” foreign forces are remembered for what they leave behind. In the 1840s, the British left forts that still stand today. In the 1980s, the Russians left tanks, trucks and aircraft strewn about the country. The U.S. is leaving heaps of mattresses, barbed wire and shipping containers in scrap yards near its shrinking bases.

“This is America’s dustbin,” said Sufi Khan, a trader standing in the middle of an immense scrap yard outside Bagram Air Field, the U.S. military’s sprawling headquarters for eastern Afghanistan.

The Bagram scrap yard is owned by Feda Mohammad Ulfat, who helped build the neighboring base more than a decade ago, transporting gravel and concrete. Now, Ulfat is helping to dismantle the base, taking in thousands of pounds of American scrap metal every day.

“I never imagined we’d be getting this much stuff,” he said.

Not all of the equipment reaching the scrap yard was deliberately damaged: Some was already broken after a decade of use.

Some of his friends thought he was crazy, but Ulfat had an idea: The expensive American gear could be melted and reconstituted as raw material for an Afghan building boom.

He’d gotten rich on dozens of other contracts with the U.S. military, and he assumed this would be no different.

When he first signed the contract, the scrap metal was only trickling in. But over the past six months, America’s drawdown has reached a fever pitch in eastern Afghanistan, with dozens of bases being closed. Suddenly, a torrent of scrap metal was delivered to Ulfat’s farm. He had to buy more land. He now spends up to a half-million dollars a month on gear that has been shredded or flattened.

When U.S. officials first began planning for their exit, the idea was to ship home the majority of their equipment, especially expensive military gear like mine-resistant vehicles.

But the $5 billion to $7 billion that the Pentagon has budgeted to ship gear back to the United States isn’t enough to take everything currently in Afghanistan, so the U.S. military decided to sell the leftovers for pennies on the pound.

Ulfat has now opened his scrap yard for the public to rummage through. Small groups of men wander around, buying broken air conditioners that can be stripped of their copper wiring or sheets of corrugated iron that can be sold to Pakistani traders.

Many of the supplies that the U.S. military used to fight its longest war have already begun their second lives in south and central Asia.

Earlier this month, Haji Montazer paced the scrap yard with his son.

Montazer once bought equipment from the Soviet forces, which began their withdrawal in the late 1980s.

“But the Russians didn’t break their things before they sold them to us,” he said.

That bitter sentiment is shared by many who visit Ulfat’s scrap yard.

The United States has not publicly explained before why its gear is destroyed before being sold. U.S. officials are quick to point out that the Afghan government typically has an opportunity to express interest in American military equipment, which is sometimes handed over intact.



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