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Originally published Saturday, October 12, 2013 at 5:12 PM

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TV ad puppets electrify Israeli gay-pride debate

Gay activists have demanded that the puppets, who have a close but ambiguous relationship, officially come out of the closet.


The Associated Press

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JERUSALEM — The goal was to promote clean energy in Israel — but TV ads starring a pair of male puppets have instead unleashed a debate about gay pride.

The puppets, named Sheka and Teka in Hebrew, have appeared in ads for the state-owned Israel Electric for more than a decade. Israelis have long playfully questioned whether they might be gay. But the arrival of a baby puppet in the new campaign set off fresh speculation about their sexual orientation.

The ads highlight a paradox in Israel: Although religion holds great sway and there is no civil marriage, gays have gained a widespread acceptance that is increasingly noted around the world. Gay activists have demanded that the ad characters, who have a close but ambiguous relationship, officially come out of the closet.

Some gay-rights advocates accuse the company of being intentionally ambiguous about their sexuality in a cynical publicity ploy.

“This should weigh on the conscience of everyone who worked on this campaign, who will come home and ask themselves whether they would want to raise a child in a country where the electric company says: ‘Hide, don’t be proud,’ ” wrote Dvir Bar in nightlife magazine City Mouse.

Sheka and Teka have drawn comparisons with another famous puppet pair: Bert and Ernie, whose sexuality also has come into question in pop culture. Sesame Workshop, which produces “Sesame Street,” has declared that the two are just good friends and they “remain puppets, and do not have a sexual orientation.”

In their latest ad, Sheka and Teka are seen in a living room, talking to a pinkish baby puppet with a tuft of orange hair. The scene then flashes back to a hospital nursery, where the baby is sucking on a pacifier and Teka congratulates Sheka on the birth of his child. It’s unclear who the mother is.

Later in the ad, the two sit on a park bench with the child. They breathe in the fresh air the electricity company suggests is made possible by cleaner energy production. Teka sniffs and suggests the baby needs a diaper change.

Other ads have seen the two on a shaded paddle boat in the Dead Sea, driving a red convertible in crisp black suits and sunglasses, and lounging on the couch in their pajamas. They have also been seen sharing a room with single beds.

Many of the ads are public-service announcements, warning children about the dangers of climbing electricity towers or getting too close to space heaters.

Israel Electric says it does not understand the fuss. It says the puppets, who have been on the air since 2002, are merely delivering the company’s messages.

“They represent the concerned Israeli, who is really worried about the air quality he is breathing and the environment he lives in. The baby that was born now represents the next generation,” said Oren Helman, a senior vice president who is behind the commercial. “There are no hints or ambiguities here.”



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