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Originally published September 10, 2013 at 5:08 PM | Page modified September 11, 2013 at 10:51 AM

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12 years after 9/11, doubts grow over government surveillance

Despite ongoing concerns about terrorism, a poll finds younger Americans appear more insistent than older Americans on greater transparency about surveillance programs as a way to ensure privacy rights are upheld.

The Associated Press

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i call the 60% number wishful thinking, its more like 80 % do not trust obama, congress... MORE
Doubts have grown about the 9/11 false flag event, period. Read Shock Doctrine... MORE
That depends on who is in office. Are Bush II and Bush III's policies distinctively... MORE

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WASHINGTON —

The American public is still anxious about terrorism on the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and about 6 in 10 Americans believe it is sometimes necessary to sacrifice rights to confront terrorism.

But suspicions about the government’s promises to protect civil liberties have deepened since 2011.

After disclosures about the National Security Agency’s massive surveillance programs, a majority of Americans believe the government is doing a poor job of protecting privacy rights, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Only 53 percent now say the government does a good job of ensuring freedoms, compared with 60 percent two years ago. Nearly 60 percent oppose the NSA’s collection of data on telephone and Internet usage.

A similar majority opposes the legal process supervised by a secret federal court that oversees the government’s classified surveillance.

The shift follows a three-month barrage of leaks to media organizations by Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who released secret documents about the surveillance agency’s inner workings.

Not until Snowden’s leaks was the massive NSA trawling — of domestic telephone numbers, and their calling patterns, and the agency’s collection of Americans’ Internet user names, IP addresses and other metadata swept up in surveillance of foreign terror suspects — confirmed and detailed.

The new poll sought to measure the public’s views on the revealed NSA activities, and it also tracked Americans’ shifting opinions over time.

Despite lingering concerns about terrorism, younger Americans appear more insistent than older Americans on greater transparency about surveillance programs as a way to ensure privacy rights are upheld.

Some 72 percent of Americans age 18 to 29 believe a leaker may be justified in providing illegal disclosures if they show the government broke the law. By contrast, 54 percent of those over age 45 say the same.

The growing anxiety about the erosion of civil liberties coincides with deepening pessimism about the war on terrorist organizations. In a poll conducted two years ago by the AP-NORC Center, 53 percent of Americans believed the U.S. was likely to win the terror war over the coming decade or that it had already done so. Now, just 44 percent expect that victory by 2023.

Americans are less nervous about other precautions that have become institutionalized since the 9/11 attacks. Despite an initial burst of controversy, more Americans favor random full-body scans or pat-downs of passengers at airports — 62 percent now compared with 58 percent in 2011.

But some 56 percent oppose the NSA’s collection of telephone records for future investigations even though they do not include actual conversations. And 54 percent oppose the government’s collection and retention of Internet metadata for future investigations that avoids actual email contents; only 34 percent favor such efforts.

Even stronger majorities oppose unauthorized government surveillance of phone calls and Internet mail traffic within the U.S. As many as 71 percent do not want officials eavesdropping on U.S. phone calls without court warrants; 62 percent oppose collection of the contents of emails without warrants.

Even before Snowden’s revelations, many Americans put a premium on privacy and civil liberties. The 2011 AP-NORC Center poll showed just 40 percent believed the government did a good job in protecting their privacy. That dropped to 34 percent in this year’s survey.

Americans are divided on whether the government ought to prove its intelligence operations abide by civil-rights protections. Fifty-one percent said it is more important to keep the details of those programs secret, but 43 percent preferred to have proof civil rights have not been violated.

Civil-liberties advocates say they have seen a sharp rise in public interest in their causes in recent months after years of lukewarm support.

“For the first time, the public is able to see what’s going on behind closed doors and it’s changing minds,” said Trevor Timm, a staffer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has sued the government to obtain secret documents on surveillance.

Obama administration officials have openly acknowledged public discontent. During a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Monday on oversight of the NSA’s surveillance programs, NSA General Counsel Robert S. Litt said the agency would consider changes that “provide greater public confidence.”

The AP-NORC Center survey was conducted Aug. 12-29 by NORC at the University of Chicago. It involved landline and cellphone interviews in English or Spanish with 1,008 adults nationwide. Results from the full survey have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.0 percentage points.

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