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Originally published August 28, 2013 at 6:49 PM | Page modified August 29, 2013 at 10:39 AM

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Montana judge apologizes for comments about teen raped by teacher

Judge G. Todd Baugh had said the 14-year-old rape victim was “older than her chronological age” and had as much control of the situation as the teacher who raped her.

The Associated Press

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BILLINGS, Mont. — A Montana judge Wednesday defended his decision to send a former teacher to prison for 30 days for raping a 14-year-old girl who later killed herself but said he “deserved to be chastised” for his comments about the young victim.

District Judge G. Todd Baugh sentenced former Billings Senior High School teacher Stacey Rambold to 15 years and then suspended all but 31 days and gave him credit for one day already served.

In handing down the sentence Monday, Baugh said the teenage victim was “older than her chronological age” and had as much control of the situation as the teacher who raped her.

Faced with a backlash over the comments and calls for his resignation, Baugh, 71, wrote an apology in a letter to the editor of The Billings Gazette. He said his comments demeaned all women and were not reflective of his beliefs.

On Wednesday, the judge spoke in his office. He said he was “fumbling around” in court trying to explain his sentence and “made some really stupid remarks.”

“I don’t know how to pass that off. I’m saying I’m sorry and it’s not who I am,” Baugh said. “I deserve to be chastised. I apologize for that.”

However, Rambold’s sentence was appropriate, he said.

Rambold was charged in October 2008 with three counts of sexual intercourse without consent after authorities alleged he had an ongoing sexual relationship with Cherice Moralez, starting the previous year when she was 14.

Moralez killed herself in 2010 at age 16 while the case was pending, and the girl’s mother, Auleia Hanlon, said her daughter’s relationship with Rambold was a “major factor.”

Hanlon said in a statement to The Gazette that she no longer believes in justice after Baugh’s sentence and remarks about her daughter. “She wasn’t even old enough to get a driver’s license. But Judge Baugh, who never met our daughter, justified the paltry sentence saying she was older than her chronological age,” Hanlon said. “I guess somehow it makes a rape more acceptable if you blame the victim, even if she was only 14.”

Under state law, children younger than 16 cannot consent to sexual intercourse.

Yellowstone County officials previously agreed to defer Rambold’s prosecution for three years and dismiss the charges if he completed a sexual-offender treatment program. The case was revived in December after prosecutors learned Rambold, 54, was kicked out of the program for having unsupervised visits with minors who were family members and not telling counselors he was having a sexual relationship with a woman.

Defense attorney Jay Lansing said Rambold has continued his treatment with a different program and an evaluation found him at low risk to reoffend. Prosecutors had recommended a 10-year prison term.

A protest scheduled for Thursday outside Yellowstone County Courthouse will go on despite Baugh’s apology, organizer Sheena Rice said.

A petition will be circulated at the protest calling for Baugh’s resignation. An online version of the petition had more than 14,000 signatures by Wednesday afternoon.

If the petition and protest aren’t enough to force Baugh’s resignation, protesters will shift to defeating him in the 2014 election, Rice said.

Yellowstone County Attorney Scott Twito previously said he disagreed with the judge’s ruling but would not appeal it.

“The judge’s reasons are his reasons and his reasons alone. He has broad authority under state law,” Twito said Tuesday.

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