Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published April 24, 2013 at 4:01 AM | Page modified April 24, 2013 at 12:42 PM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (10)
  • Print

Newtown budget with extra school security rejected

Newtown residents have rejected a budget that included money for extra school security in the wake of the December school shootings.

The Associated Press

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
It is the lighting never strikes twice in the same spot theory, after all the shootout... MORE
Dear ST_Reader, If we lived in the rational, caring country you would like to... MORE
Maybe the voters decided that paying that much for "unarmed security guards"... MORE

advertising

NEWTOWN, Conn. —

Residents have rejected a budget that included money for extra school security in the wake of the December school shootings, with town leaders suggesting the spending and required tax increases were a hard sell.

Voters on Tuesday turned down the $72 million school budget by 482 votes and rejected the $39 million town government budget by 62 votes. Nearly 4,500 residents voted on the plans, which would have represented an increase of more than 5 percent next fiscal year.

First Selectwoman Patricia Llodra said the killings of 20 children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School had an impact on the vote, the first since the massacre.

"We're very fragile as a community," she said. "We've lost some of our confidence."

Officials had put an extra $770,000 in the school and town budgets to hire extra police officers and unarmed security guards in each of Newtown's public and private schools. The plan was spurred by the Dec. 14 shootings.

Jeff Capeci, chairman of the Legislative Council, said the higher school budget also would have expanded half-day kindergarten to full-day and allowed for the hiring of a new high school administrator and for capital spending and technology.

"I thought it was an incredibly high increase for this economy," Capeci said. "At the end of the day, Newtown voters thought it was too much of an increase."

Llodra called the spending increases substantial.

"It's just beyond the ability of our community to grapple with," she said.

In contrast, the current budget is up by a fraction of 1 percent over the previous year.

Newtown's budget troubles are relatively recent and are due to the recession, the weak recovery that followed and an aging population on a fixed income, Llodra said. A revised budget will be presented for a second vote.

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Career Center Blog

Career Center Blog

The power of good manners


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►