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Originally published Friday, February 22, 2013 at 6:02 PM

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U. S. businessman, French minister spar over work ethic in France

In an unusual public exchange, the two men have been trading insults about the work habits of the French, who, according to folklore, attach more importance to coffee breaks and long, winey lunches than to efficient production.

The Washington Post

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$43 per hour to do work in France versus $30 in the U.S. says it all. France can... MORE

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PARIS — It is a battle of archetypes: Maurice “the Grizz” Taylor, the millionaire American capitalist who owns tire manufacturer Titan International, has taken on Arnaud Montebourg, a French socialist and political comer whose government title is minister of productive recovery.

In an unusual public exchange, the two have been trading insults about the work habits of the French, who, according to folklore, attach more importance to coffee breaks and long, winey lunches than to efficient production.

It is an old and entertaining subject but one that has assumed new urgency in the fifth year of an economic crisis affecting France and its European neighbors.

In a letter to Montebourg, Taylor started the battle by saying that French workers at a tire plant he had visited are overpaid, lazy and coddled by a socialist government enforcing such legally mandated rights as a 35-hour workweek, five weeks’ vacation and early retirement. But the biggest problem, Taylor said, is what the workers do, or not, while on the job.

“The French employees get high salaries but only work three hours,” he wrote in the letter, which was made available to the French media this week. “They have an hour for their breaks and their lunches, chat for three hours and work for three hours. I said this in front of French union representatives. They said that’s the way it is in France.”

Montebourg shot back that Taylor’s accusations were “as extremist as they are insulting” and revealed “a perfect ignorance of what our country is.” He added: “Do you at least know what La Fayette did for the United States of America?”

Taylor, 68, an archconservative, ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 1996 on a platform summed up in the title of his book “Kill All the Lawyers and Other Ways to Fix the Government.” (Montebourg is a lawyer by profession.) Although he got only about 1 percent of the vote in GOP primaries, Taylor has gone on his merry way buying up dying corporations for profit.

Montebourg, 50, who garnered 17 percent of the vote in the Socialist Party’s presidential primaries last year, has positioned himself in President François Hollande’s government as an industrial nationalist.

He has advocated protectionist measures to ward off competition from cheap-labor countries such as China and vowed to protect France’s wheezing factories from predatory foreign capitalists by nationalization if necessary.

In any case, the work habits of the French have long been a hot topic in France, the subject of jokes but also of such serious discussion that even the socialist government has tried to change the labor laws.

The conversation has intensified in recent months, as France’s economic growth has flatlined and factories continue to close, producing a 10 percent unemployment rate. For many economists, a big culprit is the high cost of production: an hour of work is $46 in France, compared with about $30 in the United States.

Despite the discouraging statistics, Taylor’s company, based in Quincy, Ill., tried for several years to buy part of the failing Goodyear tire factory in the northern city of Amiens, intending to specialize in heavy-duty agriculture tires. But the negotiations fizzled because, Taylor charged, French unions made unreasonable demands that were backed by the government.

When Goodyear announced Jan. 31 that it planned to close the plant, putting 1,250 French employees out of work, Montebourg wrote to Taylor suggesting that negotiations might resume. Taylor would have none of it.

“Do you think we are that stupid?” he wrote back. “Titan is the one with the money and the know-how to produce tires. What does the crazy union have? It has the French government.”

Montebourg retorted that 20,000 foreign companies operate in France, including 4,200 U.S. subsidiaries that employ nearly half a million people and find they can do business just fine.

“Far from your statements, which are as ridiculous as they are nasty, all these businesses know and appreciate the quality and the productivity of the French workforce, the commitment, the know-how, the talent and the competence of French workers,” he said.

Unwilling to leave it there, Taylor granted an interview Friday to French news service Agence France-Presse and fired off another missive to Montebourg by email.

“The extremist,” he told the minister, “is your government and its lack of knowledge on how to build a business.” He added: “Since you bring it up, why is unemployment so high in France and especially among young people? It is because of your government’s policies, sir.”

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