Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published April 24, 2012 at 6:32 PM | Page modified April 25, 2012 at 3:21 PM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (16)
  • Print

Latinos live longer with cancer than whites, blacks, study finds

In a study of patients with lung cancer, Latinos had a 15 percent lower risk of dying during the study than the non-Latino white patients. Black patients were slightly more likely to die than non-Latino white patients.

Los Angeles Times

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
One reason might be an environmental factor that's considerably different for Latinos... MORE
Well done Ann Elk! Had to fix the link to get the punch line, but it was funny so I... MORE
Strong family bonds is a good theory for Latinos that live with their families. Most i... MORE

advertising

LOS ANGELES — Researchers have called it the "Hispanic paradox": When it comes to breast cancer, prostate cancer and heart disease, Latino patients in the U.S. survive longer after diagnosis than their non-Latino white and black counterparts — even though studies have found they tend to have fewer resources and less access to care than non-Latino whites.

It's the same for lung cancer, said scientists at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami in a paper published online Monday by the journal Cancer.

Querying a vast database that tracks U.S. cancer cases, the researchers looked at 172,398 patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer, a common subtype of the disease, in the U.S. from 1988 to 2007.

Overall, the 18,206 Latino patients had a 15 percent lower risk of dying during the study than the non-Latino white patients. Black patients were slightly more likely to die than non-Latino white patients.

The Latino patients were more likely to have less deadly forms of lung cancer than non-Latino whites or blacks — and less likely to have the most aggressive types of the disease. There were no significant differences in mortality between Latino patients who were born in the U.S. and those who were born abroad, the study found.

The University of Miami researchers did not know why Latino patients tended to live longer, but suggested that it might be because they smoke less, or it might have something to do with genetics.

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

The Seattle Times photographs

Seattle space needle and mountains

Purchase The Seattle Times images


Advertising