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Monday, January 23, 2006 - Page updated at 12:00 AM

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Review casts doubt on soy's benefits

The Associated Press

DALLAS — Veggie burgers and tofu might not be so great at warding off heart disease after all.

An American Heart Association committee reviewed a decade of studies on soy's benefits and came up with results that cast doubt on the health claim that soy-based foods and supplements significantly lower cholesterol.

The findings could lead the Food and Drug Administration to re-evaluate rules that currently allow companies to tout a cholesterol-lowering benefit on the labels of soy-based food.

The panel also found that neither soy nor the soy component isoflavone reduced symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, and that isoflavones don't help prevent breast, uterine or prostate cancer. Results were mixed on whether soy prevented postmenopausal bone loss.

Based on its findings, the committee said in a statement published in the journal Circulation that it would not recommend using isoflavone supplements in food or pills and that soy-containing foods and supplements did not significantly lower cholesterol.

Nutrition experts say soy-based foods still are good because they often are eaten in place of less healthful fare such as burgers and hot dogs, and because they contain a lot of polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamins and minerals and are low in saturated fat.

But they don't have as much direct benefit as had been hoped on cholesterol, one of the top risk factors for heart disease.

"We don't want to lull people into a false sense of security that by eating soy they can solve the problem (with cholesterol)," said Dr. Michael Crawford, chief of clinical cardiology at University of California San Francisco Medical Center.

The FDA in 1999 started allowing manufacturers to claim that soy products might cut the risk of heart disease after studies showed at least 25 grams of soy protein a day lowered cholesterol. A year later, the Heart Association recommended that soy be included in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

But as more research emerged, the Heart Association decided to revisit the issue. The committee members reviewed 22 studies and found that large amounts of dietary soy protein reduced LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, by only about 3 percent and had no effect on HDL, or "good" cholesterol, or on blood pressure.

They did a separate analysis of isoflavones. The review of 19 studies suggested that soy isoflavones also had no effect on lowering LDL cholesterol or other lipid risk factors.

"Soy proteins and isoflavones don't have any major health benefits ... ," said Dr. Frank Sacks, a professor of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

Copyright © 2006 The Seattle Times Company


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