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Originally published Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 3:01 PM

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At A Theater Near You: Scarecrow celebration, Earshot fest, more

Events around town include: Scarecrow Video celebrating International Independent Video Store Day; Earshot Jazz Film Festival unspooling at Northwest Film Forum; the Celluloid Bainbridge Film Festival screening at the Historic Lynwood Theatre; and more.

Seattle Times movie critic

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Did you know that Saturday is International Independent Video Store Day? Scarecrow Video will celebrate with a VHS art show; a special rental section of movies and TV shows shot in and around Seattle; and contests with prizes including a full series pass to the 2013 Seattle International Film Festival, a Grand Illusion Cinema theater rental, a Blu-ray/region-free DVD player and more. Also note special sale prices at the store that day: 50 percent off used movies for sale, $3 off new Blu-ray and DVDs, 10 rentals for $35. Saturday only at Scarecrow Video, 5030 Roosevelt Way N.E., Seattle; 206-524-8554 or www.scarecrow.com.

The Earshot Jazz Film Festival unspools this week at Northwest Film Forum, with the Seattle premiere of the documentary "In Good Time: The Piano Jazz of Marian McPartland" screening at 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Director Huey will be in attendance, as will Seattle Times jazz critic and author Paul de Barros, who will read from his new biography of McPartland, "Shall We Play That One Together?" Also in the festival: the controversial 1961 jazz-and-junkies film "The Connection" (screening in newly restored 35mm), and the documentaries "Funk Jazz Kafe: Diary of a Decade (The Story of a Movement)" and "Deconstructing Dad," about musician/inventor Raymond Scott. NWFF, 1515 12th Ave., Seattle; for more information, see www.nwfilmforum.org or call 206-267-5380.

The Celluloid Bainbridge Film Festival screens this weekend at the Historic Lynwood Theatre. Saturday brings a day of full-length documentaries, all directed by present or past Bainbridge Islanders (including Don Sellers' and Lucy Ostrander's "The Revolutionary," which screened at SIFF earlier this year); Sunday brings a collection of short features and short documentaries, as well as the full-length features "Fat Kid Rules the World" (made in Seattle), the Oscar-nominated drama "A Better Life" (whose co-writer Roger L. Simon lives part-time on Bainbridge) and the drama "419," directed by former local Ned Thorne. All screenings are free and take place at 4569 Lynwood Center Road N.E., Bainbridge Island; for more information, see www.bainbridgeartshumanities.org.

The local premiere of "Matt's Chance," a dark comedy filmed in Seattle earlier this year, will take place Thursday at the Egyptian; doors will open at 6 p.m. The film, directed by Seattle native Nicholas Gyeney, stars Edward Furlong, Gary Busey, Margo Kidder and Lee Majors. 805 E. Pine St., Seattle; tickets are $15 at the door. For more information on the film, see www.mirrorimagesltd.com.

The great 1984 concert film "Stop Making Sense," directed by Jonathan Demme and featuring the Talking Heads, returns to the big screen this week at the SIFF Film Center, nightly at 8 p.m. through Thursday (no show Monday). Also from SIFF at the Film Center this week: two Films4Families $4 matinees of "Chicken Run," at 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and an HD broadcast of the opera "L'Italiana in Algeri" from the Teatro Comunale di Bologna, Monday at 6:30 p.m. And "French Cinema Now," a series of new works from international filmmakers working in the French language, begins Wednesday and continues through Oct. 28 at the Uptown. For more information: 206-324-9996 or www.siff.net.

All Monsters Attack! month continues at the Grand Illusion, with a double bill this week of the classic Frank Capra black comedy "Arsenic and Old Lace" playing with the 1943 Technicolor version of "The Phantom of the Opera," with Nelson Eddy, Susanna Foster and Claude Rains. "Arsenic" plays nightly at 6:45 p.m.; "Phantom" screens Friday night, then Monday through Thursday, at 9 p.m. On Saturday and Sunday at 9 p.m., film curator Dennis Nyback returns with "The Mormon Church Explains It All For You," a collection of rare films produced by the Mormon church. Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., Seattle; 206-523-3935 or www.grandillusioncinema.org.

The Frye Art Museum celebrates the 100th birthday of composer John Cage with a program of music and film at 2 p.m. Sunday. The presentation begins with a performance of Cage's "4'33"," performed by Cornish music professor Jarrad Powell, followed by a clip from "I've Got a Secret," recorded when Cage performed on the game show in 1960, and the documentary "Cage/Cunningham," about the long collaboration between the composer and choreographer Merce Cunningham. Admission is free; tickets can be picked up at the museum front desk an hour before the program. 704 Terry Ave., Seattle; 206-622-9250 or www.fryemuseum.org.

Love monster movies? Turner Classic Movies presents a double feature of "Frankenstein" and "The Bride of Frankenstein," in honor of the 100th anniversary of Universal Pictures, at 7 p.m. Thursday only. Several theaters, including Thornton Place, Southcenter, Alderwood, Bella Bottega; for more information or to buy tickets, see www.fathomevents.com.

And more scares: The Historic Everett Theatre gets into the Halloween spirit Thursday with the 1959 Vincent Price horror classic "House on the Hill." 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $5. 2911 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-258-6766 or www.everetttheatre.org.

Community Cinema Seattle presents a screening at 2 p.m. Saturday of "As Goes Janesville," a documentary about how the recession affected the town of Janesville, Wisc., where the oldest General Motors plant in North America shut down in 2008. Following the screening will be a discussion, moderated by the film's director, Brad Lichtenstein (via Skype). Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave., Seattle; admission is free. For more information: www.communitycinemaseattle.org.

And finally, this weekend's midnight movie at the Egyptian is the wonderfully warped 2004 comedy "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," which won an Oscar for screenwriter Charlie Kaufman. Friday and Saturday only, 805 E. Pine St., Seattle; 206-781-5755 or www.landmarktheatres.com.

Moira Macdonald: 206-464-2725 or mmacdonald@seattletimes.com

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