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Originally published March 18, 2014 at 8:31 PM | Page modified March 18, 2014 at 8:35 PM

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Swarm of bees delays Yankees-Red Sox exhibition

The biggest buzz didn’t come from a third straight positive outing by Michael Pineda in the New York Yankees’ 8-1 exhibition victory over Boston. That status went to a swarm of bees that took over left field and delayed the game for seven minutes.


The Associated Press

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TAMPA, Fla. – The biggest buzz didn’t come from a third straight positive outing by Michael Pineda in the New York Yankees’ 8-1 exhibition victory Tuesday over the Boston Red Sox.

That status went to a swarm of bees that took over left field and delayed the game for seven minutes before the bottom of the third inning.

“Just a strange little delay of game,” said Boston left fielder Mike Carp, who walked toward the infield to get away from the bees. “They kept coming towards me and I wanted no part of that.

“ I didn’t want a couple thousand bees on me.”

Carp clearly could hear the bees buzzing.

“It was hard to see,” he said. “I guess they were honey bees, so it wasn’t anything that was too dangerous, but nevertheless, it’s still shocking to see a swarm of bees flying around you in the middle of a baseball game.”

Pineda and Carp were Mariners teammates in 2011.

Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira went from the dugout to the clubhouse and returned with a couple of jars of honey.

“What I thought is, if you just do a line of honey out to the parking lot, the bees would maybe follow it and then leave us alone,” Teixeira said with a smile.

Umpires called out the grounds crew, which received a loud cheer after chasing the bees away with bug spray.

“I’d never seen that before,” longtime umpire Tom Hallion said.

The first batter after the stoppage, New York’s Francisco Cervelli, tripled to deep left.

“Right back into it,” Carp said.

Pineda, who missed the past two seasons while recovering from right-shoulder surgery, gave up four hits and struck out five in 41 / 3 shutout innings.

Alfonso Soriano hit a three-run homer for the Yankees.

Notes

• The Los Angeles Dodgers and Arizona Diamondbacks have arrived in Sydney, Australia, for their season-opening game Saturday.

Fifteen-hour flights took the teams across the international date line, so they missed Monday altogether and landed in a time zone 18 hours ahead of the one they left behind.

Adrian Gonzalez ripped line drives to all areas of the Sydney Cricket Ground even though it was about midnight on his body clock.

“We’re all very excited to be here,” Gonzalez said before the Dodgers’ workout. “We’ll have a few hits, see how the ball carries, but it all looks like a real ballpark.”

Arizona manager Kirk Gibson said he had fond memories of Australia because he spent his honeymoon there in 1985 “and that part worked out pretty good, so I hope this does.”

• No matter what New York Mets officials think, Matt Harvey is convinced he can pitch at some point this season.

The Mets ace had elbow ligament-replacement surgery Oct. 22 and hasn’t thrown a baseball from more than 60 feet off flat ground. New York doesn’t expect him to return until 2015.

“I still have in my mind that I want to come back this year, and whether the doctors clear that or the people upstairs have other ideas, my mindset as a competitor is to get back on the field,” the 24-year-old Harvey said.



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