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Originally published December 13, 2013 at 9:27 PM | Page modified December 13, 2013 at 10:07 PM

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Yankees say Cano got respect, just not $240 million

The Yankees had plenty of praise for Robinson Cano, just not the money he wanted.


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NEW YORK — The Yankees had plenty of praise for Robinson Cano, just not the money he wanted.

“Bouquets. Bouquets. Bouquets. I’ll throw him bouquets all he wants,” general manager Brian Cashman said. “But I couldn’t throw him $235 million.”

Cashman and Yankees officials spoke Friday, a day after the All-Star second baseman finalized a $240 million,10-year contract with the Mariners.

At his news conference in Seattle on Thursday, Cano, 31, was critical of the Yankees, saying: “I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them, and I didn’t see any effort.”

New York’s final offer was $175 million over seven years.

“We made an offer we were comfortable with making. It fell far short of obviously where Seattle was,” Cashman said. “So, in terms of respect, they showed a lot more respect financially than we did.”

Yankees managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner wasn’t disappointed with Cano’s remarks but was “a little surprised.”

“There was nothing disrespectful about the last offer that was on the table,” Steinbrenner said. “Not quite sure why he feels that way.”

Yankees president Randy Levine, asked if he was disappointed about how Cano reacted, said, “No, I feel bad for him because I think he’s disappointed he’s not a Yankee. But I respect him, and he’s free to say whatever he wants to say. We still respect him, and he’ll always be fondly remembered as a Yankee.”

Levine said Derek Jeter’s $189 million, 10-year contract in 2001 was different.

“For players over 30 years old, we don’t believe in 10-year contracts. They just have not worked out for us. They have not worked out, I believe, for the industry,” Levine said.

“When we signed Derek Jeter to a 10-year contract, I believe he was 26. In that context, it makes sense. If Mike Trout (who is 22) was here, I would recommend a 10-year contract. But for people over 30, I don’t believe it makes sense.”

Notes

Joe Girardi is happy to see Jacoby Ellsbury in Yankees pinstripes instead of the uniform of the rival Boston Red Sox. “You are going to make my job a lot easier,” the New York manager told his new outfielder. “You no longer are a thorn in my side. You are a flower in our clubhouse, and I’m happy to have you.”

• First baseman James Loney agreed to a $21 million, three-year deal to return to the Tampa Bay Rays, league sources told ESPN.

• The Kansas City Royals and second baseman Omar Infante, 31, reached a tentative agreement on a $30 million, four-year deal.

• First baseman Justin Morneau finalized a $12.5 million, two-year deal with the Colorado Rockies. Left-handed reliever Boone Logan agreed to a $16.5 million, three-year contract with the Rockies.

• Outfielder Jason Kubel returned to the Minnesota Twins, agreeing to a minor-league deal.

• Free-agent infielder David Adams agreed to a one-year deal with the Cleveland Indians.

• The Pittsburgh Pirates signed right-hander pitcher Edinson Volquez and infielder Clint Barmes to one-year deals.



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